Leupold Binoculars Review: Quality Binoculars for Every Budget

Take the kids on your next hunting excursion with you to teach them how to be the ideal spotter and pack them up with their own set of binoculars. Sounds like that could get pricey? You don’t have to avoid the best brands if you want to find a great deal on a pair of binoculars.

Leupold caters to the entire family and has everything you need from compact, weather-proof, small IPDs, low budget prices, and more. You’ll be surprised to find a couple of binoculars for less than $100 in our Leupold binoculars review.

Our line-up includes the:

But, where do you start in finding a binocular for each skill level of hunter in your family, or even just for yourself? I’ll tell you where, you start with Leupold.

“German glass” has had a fine reputation and has been the most desirable in the optics market. And, that known fact definitely gave Leupold & Stevens a head start when German immigrants, Leupold and Voelpel, founded the company at the turn of the 20th century.

Although they didn’t have a start in the hunting or firearm arena, or the optics industry for that matter, they’ve certainly found their expertise in the years that they’ve evolved. And, when it comes to your binocular needs, Leupold knows how to deliver.

After serving the wide range of types of hunters for many years and the entirety of the US military, Leupold knows how to deliver optics in a convenient, easy-to-use, and high-performing way, whether it’s in the hands of a child or in the weathered palms of a battle-scarred pro.

If you’ve got hundreds of dollars or even just a few bucks to buy Leupold binoculars, why buy anywhere else?

Leupold Binocular Reviews

Leupold has had many binoculars come and go for the many decades they’ve been in the industry, and they’ve always been a trusted name by hunters. But, one thing remains constant: the consistent quality that goes into the crafting of their optics is unmatched.

And, this Leupold binocular review will give you one product each of the best that they have to offer, no matter what hunting skill level you have – or lack. Expect to see incredibly smooth focusing, phase-corrected multi-coated lenses, light weight and compact dimensions, stylish finishes, and more.

Leupold BX-1 Yosemite 6X30 Review

bx-1-yosemite-6x30This small and compact Leupold BX-1 Yosemite 6X30 has fully multi-coated lens with L-Coat BAK4 Prisms that’s been put together with Leupold’s Synergy Built technology. It’s low 50 mm IPD, 5 mm exit pupil, and 420 wide field of view ensures that you can get optimal optical performance from this serious high-performing but user-friendly binocular.

But, what do buyers say about this Yosemite? For such a small thing, it has an impressive rating and a solid number of reviews! As you can tell, Yosemite buyers love the bino.

As the most talked about and one of the most affordable Leupold binoculars online, it’s deserving of a whole review of its own. But for today, it won a spot on this review and it’s got to share the spot light with other Leupold top-sellers.

I know I threw out a lot of acronyms and Leupold jargon at you back in the opening statement about the fantastic, little Yosemite. So, to get you up and hip with the know-how and how-to, please study the Q&A.

BX-1 Yosemite 6X30 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What does Synergy Built mean?

A. This little Yosemite might look like a humble little binocular at first, but once you take it down to its skeleton, you’ll find there’s a lot going on. Leupold created a unique team dedicated to improving innovative technology for higher performing optics that are worthy of your attention.

So, what does this entail?

The best Leupold binoculars have been constructed under the Synergy Built project. This means that every step of its manufacturing, from its glass acquirement to shelf-stocking, was intentional, scrutinized, and managed.

Every ingenious detail was deliberate, every in-house processing step was observed intimately, and every square inch had to pass quality control to determine if the final product, this seemingly mere Yosemite, meets Leupold standards. And, it needs to be if it’s going to maintain their top-shelf reputation.

Q. What is IPD?

A. IPD means Interpupillary Distance. This distance is measured from one pupil to the other. Because everyone’s eyes are set at different distances, the best binoculars should come adjustable with a good range of IPD to provide the best custom fit for the user.

This Yosemite has a low IPD of 50 mm that can get narrow enough for a child to adjust comfortably for their use. It also has a high IPD of 70 mm that’s fully capable of meeting most adult’s IPD needs. Keep in mind that full-size binoculars typically have an IPD range of anywhere between 55-75 mm, so this Yosemite pretty much covers it all.

Q. Is this a good binocular for children to use?

A. This Yosemite isn’t a full-size binocular. It has smaller dimensions that are excellent for smaller users or for a hunting pro who wants something a little more compact without losing out on optical performance.

This user-friendly sized Yosemite has the wide IPD range that will turn it into a kid-friendly optic to a serious device in a matter of a few seconds. It’s lower magnification gives an impressive wide field of view for a compact device with an ideal amount of exit pupil to stay out a little longer.

Without being “made for kids” where you’d typically see cheap materials with no optical abilities at all, this is made with quality and superior optical performance that’s still an excellent tool for your children, if that’s your intention. Otherwise, I’d stow it away and hide it from the kids if it’s meant to be yours.

Q. What is L-Coat BAK4 Prisms?

A. This porro prism binocular uses BAK4 glass to enhance its optical performance. One of the tell-tale signs of BAK4 prisms is the nice, round exit pupil you’ll see when you hold up the bino to a bright light and back away from the ocular. But, the L-Coat… let’s talk a little about that.

L-Coat is a specially-formulated glass coating that’s made to enhance light transmission and to keep chromatic aberration to an absolute minimum. And, it’s not only on this roughly $90 binocular, it’s also on their flagship line, the BX-3 Mojaves.

It’s their proprietary cold fusion, highly reflective prism mirror coating. On the Mojave, it’s a fact that it gets applied 64 times! As you would expect, their recipe for this cutting-edge coating technology is top secret, but there’s been rumor that it has a silver-based compound in the formula that gives it its reflective properties.

What does this mean for you? Bright, clear, and chromatic aberration-free glass for the best image quality whether you’re looking through a $500 Leupold binocular or a $100 one.

Q. What are the differences between this Yosemite and the Yosemite Clamshell?

A. The Yosemite line also includes a few other models in its series. But first, let me inform you of what’s available with this particular 6X30 Yosemite. It’s available with two finishes: black and natural.

The natural finish is more like a light khaki green with a hue of beige mixed in there. There’s also the 8X30 and the 10X30 model available for a little more magnification.

Now, within the same line there is also the 8X30 and the 10X30 Yosemite Clamshell binoculars. The only differences between the Clamshell and Yosemite is the packaging and finish options.

The Yosemite Clamshell 8X32 also has a Mossy Oak Treestand finish that’s well-received. The Clamshell also has more compact packaging that makes it the preferred option for retailers that only have so much room on their shelves. Other than that, they’re optically identical.

Leupold BX-1 Yosemite 6X30 Specs:

  • Magnification: 6X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 30 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 10 feet
  • Dimensions: 4.6 (L) inches
  • Weight: 17 ounces
  • Field of View: 420 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 18.5 mm/ 5 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Porro
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/No
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: No
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups and wide IPD range provides a true custom fit for any user
  • L-Coat BAK-4 prisms for leading-industry glass quality
  • Fully multi-coated lenses provide maximum light transmission for bright, clear images
  • Small, compact, and light weight design for all-purpose use
  • Available in Natural finish
  • Manufactured under the Synergy Built project
  • Armored body for heavy use and easy gripping
  • Backed by Leupold’s Full or Limited Lifetime Guarantee

Rating:

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Leupold BX-1 Rogue 8X25 Review

bx-1-rogue-8x25This compact Leupold BX-1 Rogue 8X25 is small in size but large in quality. It has fully multi-coated lenses, is fully waterproof and fog-proof, and is an extremely light weight bino that’s been made with the Synergy Built guarantee.

Online, it has a decent amount of reviews. But, for the reviews it currently has, the mini bino has a fantastic rating.  This little thing sure is big in the online marketplace.

Since this is one of the best Leupold binocular reviews online, it should be expected that I would choose the smallest binocular of Leupold’s compact series. While I could’ve gone with any of the other models in the Rogue series, the 8X25 proved to be most popular out of the lot.

So, how has this little guy earned such a big reputation? Here’s our revealing Q&A that tells how this compact bino has a reputation that precedes itself.

BX-1 Rogue 8X25 Binocular Q&A:

Q. How is this Rogue binocular different to the compact Yosemite?

A. If you’re in the binocular market looking to buy compact Leupold binoculars, then you’re definitely going to come across these two series, and it mightn’t be a black and white decision in choosing which one you want. Let me inform you of the differences.

Appearance. While the binos both have the porro prism design, this Rogue is more on the unattractive and bulky side and the Yosemite has a unique “clamshell” design. However, the Rogue has a slightly smaller length of 4.3 inches and is lighter, weighing in at 12.7 ounces.

You’ll also notice the higher magnifications and larger objective lens sizes that’s available with the Rogue series versus the Yosemite line. They are the Rogue 8X42, 8X50, 10X25, 10X42, and the 10X50.

The Rogues are weatherproof, which is impressive for a porro prism binocular. They’ve also been purged with Leupold’s proprietary Nitrogen gas fill process for ultimate fog-proof-ability that is something the Yosemites lack.

Which one’s cheaper? The Rogue 8X25 – but only by a few bucks, literally.

Q. What are the advantages of the porro prism design?

A. The benefits of porro prisms is that they can be made to be optically superior to roof prisms. They can provide brighter images because there’s less light being lost in the light path from the objective lenses to the ocular lenses. Less reflections are a consequential benefit in a porro prism versus a roof prism.

They also don’t need phase corrected coatings in order to work like roof prisms do. This brings down a lot of the cost when manufacturing and putting together the prism assembly. Porro prism binoculars are also known for being heavier and bigger than roof prisms, but this BX-1 Rogue has the upper hand because it’s a compact bino.

Q. Are there any other finishes available with the Rogue series?

A. As far as this Rogue 8X25 model goes, there’s only the black finish that’s available, and for a low price of about $85 online. The 8X42 and 10X50 models are available with the Mossy Oak Break-Up finish, but you’ll have to remember that this drives up the cost, not just for the showy finish, but for the extra magnification and larger objective lens size too.

Q. Is this a compact binocular?

A. This particular 8X25 and the 10X25 binos are compact units. They’re only 4.3 inches in length and they weigh a light 12.7 ounces. They’re the ideal-sized, compact bino that’ll fit in the pocket of your camo vest and are super-light weight to tote around.

However, not all of the Rogue binoculars share this compact or reverse porro prism design.

The other models have the traditional porro prism design. The largest one is the BX-1 Rogue 10X50 that weighs a whopping 33 ounces and is 7 inches in length. The next heifer is the BX-1 Rogue 8X50 that weighs 29.7 ounces and is a long 7.3 inches in length.

The Rogue is a versatile series that provides a wide range of options for the hunter that’s in the market for a new and affordable binocular.

Leupold BX-1 Rogue 8X25 Specs:

  • Magnification: 8X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 25 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 14.10 feet
  • Dimensions: 4.3 (L) inches
  • Weight: 12.7 ounces
  • Field of View: 337 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 15 mm/ 3.13 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Porro
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: No
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups and wide IPD range provides a true custom fit for any user
  • BAK-4 prisms for leading-industry glass quality
  • Fully multi-coated lenses provide maximum light transmission for bright, clear images
  • Small, compact, and light weight design for all-purpose use
  • Fully waterproof and fog-proof with Leupold’s proprietary Nitrogen fill process
  • Manufactured under the Synergy Built project
  • Armored body for heavy use and easy gripping
  • Backed by Leupold’s Full or Limited Lifetime Guarantee

Rating:

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Leupold BX-1 McKenzie 10X42 Review

bx-1-mckenzie-10x42This roof prism Leupold BX-1 McKenzie 10X42 binocular is fully waterproof, fog-proof, and tripod adaptable. It has fully multi-coated lenses with phase coated BAK-4 prisms in a light chassis body of 22 ounces on the ideal 10X42 platform.

There is a great size review base for this affordable binocular online. It has a strong rating with dozens of people reporting positive light on the all-purpose hunting binocular. With these kind of ratings, this BX-1 can obviously hold its own.

As one of the more affordable Leupold products and one of the most popular ones on available online, this McKenzie didn’t have to fight hard for a spot on this Leupold binocular review.

As the first roof prism binocular mentioned in this review, let’s take a more detailed look into what sets it apart from the above porro prism binoculars in the Q&A.

BX-1 McKenzie 10X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What are the advantages of the roof prism design?

A. The aligned oculars and objective lenses of this McKenzie binocular is a tell-tale mark of the roof prism design and is more aesthetically pleasing, at least to me. However, they’re more complicated to make and they need specially-made coatings. But, this limitation can be overcome to turn roof prism binos into first-rate and high-caliber optics.

First of all, an advantage includes its lighter weight and much more rugged build versus a porro prism. The extra detail needed to make the prisms require a robust and sturdy build. They’re often lighter than a porro prism, although, sometimes the half ounce to ounce difference is negligible.

Secondly, since light is split into two and then combined again in roof prisms, light loss is more significant than with porro prisms. But, with phase corrected coatings, they can still be superior optics that can maintain color fidelity, improve light transmission, and reduce chromatic aberrations. Unfortunately, this does raise the cost of the binocular.

Q. How do I attach a tripod to the Leupold binocular?

A. This Leupold binocular is tripod adaptable, however, it seems people get lost trying to figure this process out. Here’s a quick step-by-step to wash away all the confusion online.

  • Locate the “L” symbol on the front of the binocular; it’s in between the objective bells
  • Unscrew this cap that’s attached to the body of the binocular
  • This reveals the bushing or the threading for an L angle adapter
  • Thread the adapter onto the binocular
  • Attach the tripod to the adapter

While this McKenzie is a tripod adaptable binocular, it doesn’t come with the L adapter or the tripod in the binocular purchase. You’ll need to purchase these things separately in order to mount it.

Q. Where are these Leupold binoculars made?

A. Let me preface this by saying, Leupold has strict quality control measurements in place to ensure that every single aspect that goes into the making of their optics meets their incredibly high standards. While Leupold’s story is that of achieving the American Dream, this McKenzie is made in China.

Don’t be disappointed. Because of Leupold’s Synergy Built project and high business standards, each binocular is kept under Leupold’s watchful eye, whether it’s been made in China, Japan, or America. The outsourcing of Leupold’s manufacturing process is also what keeps their binoculars within the realistic price range for many of us hunters who are counting our pennies.

Q. Are there any extra accessories that come with the McKenzie binocular?

A. Yes! For an entry level binocular with an entry level price tag, you won’t be disappointed to know there are some freebies when your package finally arrives. Although it comes with the standard accessories, it’s still a delight to get them.

Don’t try to tell me I’m wrong. If you bought your brand new McKenzie and if you didn’t get your extra accessories with it, I can guarantee that you’d be right back at the store asking for the bonus items, and maybe some extras for your inconvenience… am I right?

The extra accessories are a black binocular case, eyepiece caps, objective lens caps, lens cleaning cloth, neck strap, and binocular user’s guide.

Q. How do I attach the binoculars to the included neck strap?

A. For the sake of clarity and to provide a helpful, friendly, and simple step-by-step guide, here is the “how-to”.

The first way is to use the key-ring attachment that comes with the neck strap. This is also known as the quick release buckle attachment.

  • Take the swivel off the neck strap to get easy access to the key-ring piece.
  • Turn the bino to the side and attach the key-ring piece this way.
  • Working from the top will give you an awkward angle that will make this step difficult.
  • You can open the key-ring piece with the blade of a small pocket-knife or something similar. For those of you out there with long and strong finger-nails, you have the perfect tool right there.
  • Open the first ring of the key-ring piece and attach it to the binocular anchor and keep circling it until it’s completely made the round and it’s on.
  • Attach the swivel to the key ring piece and back on the neck strap.

The other method is simple as well but it’s not a quick release set up.

  • Take the quick release buckle and the swivel off the neck strap.
  • Simply insert the strap through the binocular anchor.
  • Thread the strap through until you have enough length to use the standard buckle that connects both ends of the strap.

Leupold BX-1 McKenzie 10X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 10 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.80 (L) inches
  • Weight: 22 ounces
  • Field of View: 305 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 13.7/4.2 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups and wide IPD range provides a true custom fit for any user
  • BAK-4 prisms for leading-industry glass quality with phase coatings for ultimate prism performance
  • Fully multi-coated lenses provide maximum light transmission for bright, clear images
  • Fully waterproof and fog-proof with Leupold’s proprietary Nitrogen fill process
  • Manufactured under the Synergy Built project
  • Armored body for heavy use and easy gripping
  • Backed by Leupold’s Full or Limited Lifetime Guarantee

Rating:

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Leupold BX-2 Cascades 10X42 Review

bx-2-cascades-10x42This Leupold BX-2 Cascades 10X42 binocular has L-Coat BAK4 Prisms, short close focus distance, and a great twilight factor that was all put together under the Synergy Built project. It’s also fully waterproof, fog-proof, and has a durable armor coating that gets you a great grip while protecting it.

Hunters are pretty excited about the newer line of Cascades. It has a fantastic rating online. If you buy Leupold binoculars because of ratings, then this is a great one right here!

This particular bino is a hit – the ratings don’t lie. But, I wanted to feature a Leupold binocular that fell into the mid-range budget. At around $300 for this premium binocular, it’s one of the better deals Leupold has.

But, will this binocular be good for more than just hunting? How about in the hands of my clumsy teens? For everything you want to know about this all-purpose bino, feel free to address the Q&A.

BX-2 Cascades 10X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. Which Cascade should I get – the 8X42 or 10X42?

A. The Cascade 8X42 binos are going to be an excellent binocular for most of your needs. If you prefer the wider field of view, larger exit pupil, and longer eye relief, you’ll want this model.

The larger exit pupil of 5.25 mm will be excellent for low light hunting conditions. And, if you’re in close range hunting grounds like the woods, the 8X42 will be your short distance pal.

The Cascade 10X42 on the other hand has the most popular binocular platform that hunters can’t get enough of. While you are compromising on field of view and exit pupil, you’re gaining the higher twilight factor of 18.30 and a higher magnification – perfect for the open plains.

You might want a tripod if you’re going to be bird watching or you need to see the pulse of your target from long distances. When you need intimate detail at such high magnifications, you’ll need to eliminate hand shaking and any slight movements to get the maximum performance out of your bino.

Q. How can I tell the differences between Leupold’s binocular rating system?

A. This can get a little confusing, especially if you’ve noticed all the Xs and letters. Right about now, you’re probably wondering what it all means. Well, Leupold uses a rating system of their products to indicate to the level of quality glass, lens coatings, build, etc.

To start with, the rating sequence starts with a letter that precedes the letter X, followed by a number. For the first letter, riflescopes start with a V, spotting scopes start with an S, and binoculars start with a B. The number then indicates the level of quality the binocular falls into.

For example, the BX-1 Yosemite 6X30 indicates that this Yosemite is an entry level binocular.

This particular BX-2 Cascades 10X42 has a mid-range quality with slightly better optical performance and quality than a BX-1. BX-3 binos will are Leupold’s premium products. And, the golden ring featured on top-shelf binos indicates that they’re made in the good ol’ USA.

Q. What kind of eyecups does this binocular have?

A. This BX-2 binocular has twist up eyecups that provide a custom fit to help you find the sweet spot suited for your comfort and vision. It’s definitely the most popular design because the forget-it and set-it feature makes it easy to use and easy to like.

It has a standard 16 mm eye relief. If you’ve got really long eye lashes or if you wear sun shades and spectacles, this amount of eye relief is going to be helpful.

Q. What is this binocular’s close focus distance?

A. It’s a close 9.90 feet. For an all-purpose binocular, this a great figure to see, especially when somewhere between 15 feet and more is considered “okay”. It still doesn’t compare to champion binos that come in at a close 3 feet.

But, if you’re the typical hunter where you just need enough to see the 4X4 rack on a bull and not the chiggers on its underside, then this 10X42 and 9.90 close focus distance is going to be more than enough.

Leupold BX-2 Cascades 10X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 9.90 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.50 (L) inches
  • Weight: 23.10 ounces
  • Field of View: 267 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 16 mm/4.2 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups for a true custom fit for any user
  • BAK-4 prisms for leading-industry glass quality with L-Coat cold mirror phase coatings for ultimate prism performance
  • Fully multi-coated lenses provide maximum light transmission for bright, clear images
  • Fully waterproof and fog-proof with Leupold’s proprietary Nitrogen fill process
  • Manufactured under the Synergy Built project
  • Armored body for heavy use and easy gripping
  • Backed by Leupold’s Full or Limited Lifetime Guarantee

Rating:

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Leupold BX-3 Mojave 10X50 Review

bx-3-mojave-10x50This Leupold BX-3 Mojave 10X50 is a premium binocular that’s built with an open-bridge roof prism design, cold mirror prism coatings with fully multi-coated lenses in a slim and ergonomic design.

Its completely weatherproof, has twist up eyecups, and is guaranteed to be on par with world-class optics because it’s Synergy Built.

This new Mojave has a great rating with dozens and dozens of reviews under its belt. That’s a really good sized fan base for a bino that costs around $500 online.

I had to feature a premium bino from Leupold, and I thought I’d mix it up a bit with a 10X50 instead of a 10X42. A little low light strength is something all avid hunters could do with – whether you’re a kid by your dad’s side or a dad feeling like a kid again.

To make the most of your dime, read the Q&A to get a full run down on what the flagship series of the Leupold binocular line up has to offer.

BX-3 Mojave 10X50 Binocular Q&A:

Q. Why doesn’t this binocular have ED glass?

A. Extra-Low Dispersion glass is something you’d typically see in this price range for a premium binocular. But, what does ED do? It eliminates chromatic aberration by keeping light from scattering within the light path. So, why doesn’t this Leupold have it? Simple – it doesn’t need it.

The L-Coat cold mirror phase coatings is applied 64 times on this Mojave binocular! You know what this means? Ultimate brightness, clarity, and color fidelity for the best image quality you can imagine.

The painstaking detail that went into perfecting the prism technology eliminates the need to add anything else – even ED marketing and the like.

Q. Is this a good low light binocular?

A. 10X50 binoculars are touted for their low light abilities and what they can offer the hunter, and this Mojave is right in line with that adage. It has a 5 mm exit pupil, large 50 mm objective lens, and a twilight factor of 22.40.

With these specs, you’ll be able to glass for hours after your day-restricted buddies have packed up and gone home.

Q. What are the BX-3 Mojave Pro Guide HD binoculars?

A. These are new to 2016 and they should get you excited. These are going to be a little more expensive than the regular Mojaves, and that’s because of two things. The first is, the Pro Guide has HD lens, HD as in High-Definition.

The calcium-fluoride lenses help to improve image quality even more on the already excellent and high-performing optic.

The second thing is the finish. The regular Mojave has black and Mossy Oak Treestand finishes. The Mojave Pro Guide HD has black, Kryptek Typhon, and Kryptek Highlander finishes. These are pretty fancy and swank if you’re looking for a really cool finish with a price that matches it.

Q. How much does this binocular cost?

A. The BX-3 Mojave 10X50 is a premium binocular, so beware, it’s going to have a premium price tag. It’s going to run you up around $430 online. The Mojave Pro Guide is even more expensive and costs approximately $580 big ones!

But, even these exorbitant prices couldn’t keep Leupold fans away. Serious hunters, avid learners, and eager rookies are more than willing to spend their last dimes on this big-ticket item. Since Leupold should be your last purchase, I’d say it’s worth it.

Leupold BX-3 Mojave 10X50 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 50 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 15 feet
  • Dimensions: 6.60 (L) inches
  • Weight: 28.20 ounces
  • Field of View: 263 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 17 mm/5 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups for a true custom fit for any user
  • Open bridge roof prism design for slim and streamlined look
  • Popular Kryptek finishes available
  • HD calcium-fluoride glass elements for incredible image quality
  • BAK-4 prisms for leading-industry glass quality with L-Coat cold mirror phase coatings for ultimate prism performance
  • Fully multi-coated lenses provide maximum light transmission for bright, clear images
  • Fully waterproof and fog-proof with Leupold’s proprietary Nitrogen fill process
  • Manufactured under the Synergy Built project
  • Armored body for heavy use and easy gripping
  • Backed by Leupold’s Full or Limited Lifetime Guarantee

Rating:

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Which are the Best Leupold Binoculars For You?

For the child hunter or even the serious adult who’s looking for an easy-to-use and hand-held unit for under a hundred bucks, the Yosemite is the perfect bino to get it done.

Its wide IPD can even have you both sharing the optic if you needed to – it’s just that good. This one has a high recommendation from me because it’s going to be a hit, not just for your kid, but for yourself too.

The Rogue is also another compact bino that you should consider, and you might just save a few bucks on it too.

Now, the McKenzie. This full-size baby has everything you need in a light weight and practical binocular. You can take this thing anywhere and use it on any target. For around $100, this might just be the best of what you can afford.

All hunters with varying skill levels will find this a trustworthy and dependable friend.

Next in line is the Cascades bino. This is an excellent choice if you’re wanting something with just a little bit more quality. This puts you in the mid-range level of binos with matching price tags. If this is the best you can do with your budget, then this is the winner.

But, for the low light hunter who’s got some up-front cash to spend, I don’t think I need to pressure you into buying either the Mojave or its Pro Guide counterpart. More experienced hunters will maximize its potential and will truly practice safe and ethical low light hunting skills.

Choosing Leupold is Easy

The hard part isn’t in choosing which brand you want to spend your money on or what brand you want to put into your kids’ hands. It’s choosing which Leupold you can only have just one of that’s the hard part.

But then again, you could always buy one bino of each line and say it’s for each member of the family. That way you can justify the cost and you’re just “borrowing” them all when it’s time for the hunt.