Meopta MeoStar S2 82 HD Spotting Scope (Interchangeable Eyepieces)

meostar-s2-82-straightViewing Configuration: Straight
Magnification: 20-70X
Power Variability: Variable
Adjustable Eyepieces: Yes
Eyepiece included: No
Objective Diameter: 82 mm
Close Focus Distance: 13.62 feet
Length: 12.83 inches
Weight: 51.29 ounces
Field of View: 144.36-68.9 feet/1000 yards
Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 18/4.1-1.2 mm
Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
Glass: Schott
Focus System: Collar/Dual Focus
Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
Digiscope adaptable: Yes

Best Uses: Hunting, For the Range, Birdwatching, Wildlife Observation, Photography

Our Rating: 5 Stars

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MeoStar S2 82 Spotting Scope Review

This MeoStar S2 82 HD spotting scope has MeoDrop, MeoBright, and MeoShield coatings. It also has the CentricDrive focus system, interchangeable eyepieces, and a special security system for the eyepieces.

The MeoStar doesn’t have a current consumer rating at the time of writing. But, as more and more hunters find themselves directed towards the underestimated brand, we predict that there will be nothing but 5 star ratings all around.

And, our line-up of spotting scope reviews wouldn’t be complete without a fully-detailed run-down of Meopta’s flagship scope line, the MeoStar.

So, what makes this spotting scope different to Meopta’s other spotter, the MeoPro? For all those comparative questions, here’s our Q&A.

PROs:
  • Price
  • Interchangeable eyepiece
  • Digiscope adaptable
  • Dual focus
  • Fully weatherproof
CONs:
  • No compact model
  • Heavy

 

MeoStar S2 82 HD Spotting Scope Q&A:

What is MeoDrop?

This is a new external lens coating that I haven’t yet seen before on a Meopta optic. And, from the sounds of it, it’s comparable to Zeiss’ LotuTec coating technology.

The idea is, when the lenses gets gritty and grimy from grease, oils, rain, and even fingerprints, the hydrophobic coating repels these contaminates. Water will bead up and roll off.

When it comes time to wiping the lens down, it shouldn’t require more than just a gentle swipe of a cloth.

As for MeoBright and MeoShield, you can read about those features in the Q&A section of our MeoPro 80HD review as these technologies are also featured on the more affordable Meopta spotting scope.

 

Are there other eyepieces available?

The MeoStar S2 spotters have the ability to allow you to switch out the eyepieces, and this is a feature that’s not seen on the more affordable MeoPro 80 HD.

There are two eyepieces that are available: the 30-60X WA and 20-70X.

Note: You do have to purchase the eyepiece separately from the rest of the scope. Just remember that in case you’re all quizzical when you get your package and the eyepiece is missing.

 

What does WA in the description of the 30-60X WA Eyepiece mean?

If you’re wondering what the WA in the eyepiece name stands for, it means Wide Angle.

You should presume that you’ll have a much wider, angular field of view, and this will reflect in a larger linear field of view.

The field of view for the 30-60X WA eyepiece is a much wider 144.36-68.9 feet.

It’s angular field of view is 66 degrees throughout the entire 30-60X power ranges.

Whereas, the angular field of view for the 20-70X eyepiece is 45-63 degrees from low power to max power.

 

Is there a security system of some kind for the adjustable eyepieces?

Yes! The new eyepieces allow for a bayonet mount to be used. This means that the eyepiece can be securely interlocked with the objective body module to ensure it’s staying put.

To change out the eyepiece or break down the scope for a slightly more compact pack, just hit the release button on the eyepiece and gently twist it out.

Since this spotter has interchangeable eyepieces, the quick-release system is unique to the MeoStar and isn’t seen on the MeoPro.

 

What kind of prism system does the MeoStar spotting scope have?

Do you remember your optics 101 research where it mentioned something about a roof prism assembly? Well, that’s pretty much what the MeoStar S2 has, but a variation.

This variation of the roof prism that this MeoStar is built with is the Schmidt-Pechan prism system. It involves a folded light path that allows for the entire spotter to be somewhat smaller and more compact in size.

Speaking of which, the MeoStar is 12.83 inches in length and is 51.29 ounces, both measurements are without the eyepiece attached. So, it’s actually a little more size-friendly for the hunter over the MeoPro

 

What is the Meoptas image quality like?

Flawless. The prism system or the prism glass has undergone the most developed and expert-engineered in-house processes that involves grinding and polishing to within +/- 1 second.

This means that you can glass for hours at a time without eye discomfort. And, eye comfort is a very important factor to consider when using a spotter. Eye relief is also a long 18 mm.

But, as far as resolution, contrast, and brightness, you can expect the best. With MeoBright under its belt, you’re getting $3000-$4000 optical quality in a $2000 optic.

 

How weatherproof is the MeoStar?

It’s tougher than most optics in the market. It can withstand submersion up to around 6 feet. So, you know that this thing is going to be a work-horse during those hunts with harsh weather.

It’s also going to withstand extreme temperature changes because it’s been purged with Nitrogen gas and then sealed to ensure it’s fully fogproof.

 

What are the recommended accessories for this Meopta scope?

There’s quite the list for the MeoStar, and if you’re prepared to buy Meopta scopes, you’ll quickly become apart of the family for their Meo accessories.

You’ll want to purchase one of the MeoStar eyepieces and their recommended TP1 tripod.

Along with these things, the other recommended accessories are the objective and eyepiece lens caps, a soft carry case, and a stay-on cover.

 

How convenient is it to use the stay-on cover?

While the cover is built rather excellently, it’s a bit of a let down when it actually comes to needing to use it while the scope is in the field.

Don’t get me wrong, the case is strong, good-looking, and is an excellent protection for the scope while in transit or stowed away, but the unconventional design of the scope changes the tune.

Instead of the conventional design of having flaps, zippers, or some sort of opening at the objective lens end and the ocular end, it actually has a full-body zipper that doesn’t even reach the ends of the scope.

To have access to them and to use the entire focus ring, you pretty much have to pull the entire thing off to the sides. Not a big deal? Wrong. If there’s any amount of wind, it’s going to be flapping and flopping around rather annoyingly.

It also leaves the scope completely exposed to the elements. Isn’t this predicament why we have stay-on covers in the first place?

 

Does a sunshade come with the MeoStar S2 spotting scope?

No, a sunshade doesn’t come in the box when you buy the MeoStar.

That’s because it’s already in the scope. It’s built-in and retractable, so when that nasty weather starts pouring down on you, just pull it on out.

The sunshade has also been anodized to give it that extra bit of protection to repel and deter stray light and moisture when you’ve got the sunshade out.

 

Are there any other MeoStar S2 models?

There is only one other MeoStar other than this straight version one, and it’s the angled MeoStar S2.

While there is no straight model for the MeoPro 80 HD, the MeoStar S2 has both straight and angled available and only in the 82 mm.

 

Is there a compact Meopta spotting scope?

No. Although it could be arguable that this is a compact spotter, only because it’s smaller than the MeoPro, it’s really not.

The large 82 mm lens puts some hefty weight on the scope, and the 51.29 ounces it weighs is still without the eyepiece attached.

I still think that the MeoPro should be the line that introduces a compact spotter, if only to make it more affordable for hunters on a budget like me.

 

Noteworthy Features:

  • MeoBright, MeoShield, and MeoDrop coatings for optimal image quality
  • HD Fluoride-containing glass to reduce color fringing
  • CentricDrive focus system for fast focusing from close range to extended distances
  • 2 variable zoom eyepieces available: 20-70X and 30-60X WA
  • Bayonet quick release system on eyepieces
  • Built-in retractable sunshade
  • Submersion tight to 6 feet and fully fog-proof
  • Backed by Meopta’s Lifetime Warranty

 

Our Verdict

The scoop on the scope is, the Meopta MeoStar S2 82 Straight Spotting Scope is a hell of a buy! It has practically everything a spotting scope can have, minus the reticle. But, if you’re birding or taking wildlife photos from a far, you don’t need it! While it is heavy and large for the hunter, if you’re up in a stand or hiding out in a blind, you’ll be set up for a spotting session for miles.

The equal to the MeoStar is Meopta’s MeoPro 80 HD spotter. The only thing it lacks is the interchangeable eyepiece technology, but that’s a luxury anyway. Besides, it’s also more affordable without it. Check out the MeoPro here.

If you’re not ready to delve into a brand you’ve never heard of, you can always check out Zeiss. Their Conquest Gavia 85 can match everything the Meopta spotter has, and it also comes with an included eyepiece which is refreshing for a top-notch, expensive brand.

But, you’ve got to give it to Meopta for competing with the big dogs in the optic industry. They’ve got the right prices on their side with the expert glass along for the ride. You’ve got nothing to lose with this exceptional brand!

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