Nikon Spotting Scope Reviews: A Closer Look at 5 of Nikon’s Scopes

For us long distance hunters, not only do you need a great rifle scope, but a just as equally or more powerful spotting scope to tag along with you on the hunt. Being able to keep your distance while still trailing the herd can mean the difference between a filled tag or an empty one.

So, if you’re looking for more information on what it means to have fully multi-coated optics, quality coatings, and even image stabilization, don’t go anywhere else! You’ll get all of that info and more from this Nikon spotting scope review.

We will check out the following Nikon spotters:

Nikon Spotting Scope Reviews

Now, Nikon has been providing it all when it comes to sport optics, and for a very long time too. So, there’s no doubt here as to their reputation and the quality of their spotting scopes.

But, the downer to some well-known brands is the enormous selection of optics that can quickly overwhelm you. And, if any of you are familiar with Nikon’s astronomical amount of rifle scopes and binoculars, you’ll be relieved to know that their fieldscope inventory is significantly smaller – thank goodness.

Without having to filter through what’s borderline okay and what’s exceptional alone, I’ll take you through the best Nikon spotting scopes, from low budget to top dollar.

Since their small fieldscope inventory goes straight to the heart of providing you with exactly what you need, be prepared to see camera adaptable scopes, specially formulated lens coatings, and full weatherproof-ability.

Nikon Fieldscope ED 13-30X50 Straight Review

nikon fieldscope 13 30-50This Nikon Fieldscope 13-30X50 has ED glass and fully multi-coated optics for high-resolution images. It’s also fully weatherproof, is lightweight and compact, and is digiscope-compatible.

The ED 50 has been out for quite some time, and even with its relatively old age, it only has a piddling review base. Even though it’s sporting perfect rating, disappointingly, I don’t feel like it would be fair to portray such a stellar rating with so few reviews to date.

But, don’t let that get you down. I chose this particular fieldscope because of its quality. Its clean and highly-functional features is what will draw other hunters to it the same way it has me.

So, let’s go over what features it has that would make it an excellent optic for when you need that extra “reach” in the field.

Nikon Fieldscope ED 50 Q&A:

Q. Is this Nikon a compact spotting scope?

A. The ED 50 is a lightweight and compact fieldscope that is a fantastic alternative to a full-size one, especially if your hunting style has you on the move a lot.

It’s also going to be convenient to consider the ED 50 if you’re not the type of hunter that likes to carry around a full-size tripod either. You also might want to think along the lines of mounting to a rifle stock? But, we’ll get into this later.

Its dimensions are: length x width – 11.2 x 2.8 inches. It also only weighs 19.6 ounces – this is on par with many compact binoculars.

Q. What is the image quality like?

A. Optically, this Nikon ED 50 is stellar! It has everything you want to see with fantastic glass.

For those that need a refresher, ED stands for Extra-Low Dispersion glass. This is a premium feature that eliminates chromatic aberrations which you would know as color fringing – the colored, blurry fuzz that surrounds the edges of your image.

Another credit to the image quality is the fully multi-coated lenses. The multiple coatings are being applied to carefully cut and polished glass that have had impurities buffed out to ensure pristine, sharp, and color-true images.

Q. Does the ED 50 lose quality at 30X power?

A. All sport optics will compromise on contrast, sharpness, and color fidelity the higher the power you use. And typically, it will cost you an arm and a leg to buy a spotting scope that retains stellar performance at 20X as it does at 60X.

But, as far as this Nikon ED 50 goes, its power range is 13-30X and its performance will truly impress you. During daylight and bright conditions, expect to see excellent clarity without any compromise of image quality throughout all the magnification settings – seriously.

During low light hours, you’re going to get the best use up to about 25X power, after that, you will lose a bit of quality as far as sharpness and clarity goes.

Q. Can it be handheld at all?

A. All fieldscopes are made to be tripod mounted, but with compact devices, you can almost always get away with handheld use at lower magnifications. And, this Nikon is no exception!

You can pretty much use this Nikon ED as a handheld device up to around 15X. Again, for those of you hunters who are constantly on the move, a rigged mount to a rifle stock could also make this little ED 50 of even more use.

But shhh, that’s not an official recommendation since it could void your fieldscope warranty if you ever needed to send it in. But, this mounting technique is used by plenty of hunters who want to maximize fieldscope handheld convenience and portability in one.

Q. What is the eye relief of this fieldscope?

A. After all the great things about this nifty, compact scope, it’s a shame the eye relief with the provided zoom eyepiece is so short. It has 12.9 mm of eye relief at 13X power.

Of course, you’ll get a little more eye relief at lower magnifications, but you want super power, that’s why you have a spotting scope in the first place, right? So, just be prepared to have a little discomfort and a red ring around your eye socket after about 5-10 mins of constant glassing.

Warning: If you’re hunting alone, no big deal, but you might be the cause of a laughing riot if you’re hunting with a pack of buddies – just saying.

But, the silver lining is you can change out the eyepiece with a new one, and just be sure to shop for longer and more forgiving eye relief.

Q. What does the purchase of the ED 50 come with?

A. You penny pinchers will love this – it comes with the 13-30X zoom eyepiece, sliding sunshade, eyepiece travel pouch, adjustable carry straps, and lens covers.

A lot of the time, depending on your seller, you’ll also receive an included neoprene carry case. Just a word of caution though – this is only intended by Nikon for storage use. If you were hoping that you could keep your scope covered while using it, you’re out of luck. Unless…

You were to show off some mad sewing skills and rig your case in a way to expose the eyepiece, objective lens, and the focus knob… Perhaps, cut the end of the case and sew on a zipper on the objective lens end and… tada! You now have a usable carry case while out in the field – you’re welcome!

Fieldscope ED 50 Specs:

  • Viewing Configuration: Straight
  • Magnification: 13-30X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Adjustable Eyepieces: Yes
  • Eyepiece included: Yes
  • Objective Diameter: 50 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 9.8 feet
  • Length: 11.2 inches
  • Weight: 19.6 ounces
  • Field of View: 157 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 12.9 mm/ 3.8 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: Not Listed
  • Focus System: Focus Knob/Single Focus
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Digiscope adaptable: Yes

Noteworthy Features:

  • 13-30X power for low magnifications and handheld capability to high power for close and fine detail viewing
  • 50 mm objective lens especially beneficial for hunters looking for lightweight portability and low light strength
  • Impressive close focus distance of 9.8 feet with provided zoom eyepiece
  • Fully fog-proof and waterproof to endure all types of weather
  • Compact and lightweight but well-built and solid to work exceptionally well on tripods
  • ED Glass with fully multi-coated optics for the best image quality from 13-30X power
  • Backed by Nikon’s Limited Lifetime Warranty/Without Electric Components

Rating:

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Nikon Prostaff 3 16-18X60 Fieldscope Outfit Review

prostaff-3-16-48x60This Prostaff 3 Outfit has Eco-Glass, fully multi-coated optics, and an integral zoom eyepiece. It’s also fully waterproof and fog-proof, is lightweight and compact, and has the Outfit package thrown in.

Online, it has a decent rating, which is still good, but it could be better. Again, there’s only a handful of reviews to date.

As the only Prostaff 3 and the most affordable fieldscope Nikon currently has to offer, I’m sure you’re going to be interested in this one.

So, if you’ve got about $300 to spend, you might want to pay attention to the Q&A to see if it’s worth your dough.

Nikon Prostaff 3 Outfit Q&A:

Q. What is Eco-Glass?

A. Many optic companies are making environmentally-friendly scopes that are manufactured without lead and arsenic.

Although, Nikon doesn’t go into the specific details of what Eco-Glass means to them on their product page, it would be safe to assume they hold up to the industry-wide definition of Eco-Glass.

Q. What are fully multi-coated optics?

A.. You’ll see this term a lot while shopping for not only spotting scopes, but also for many other hunting optics such as laser rangefinders, rifle scopes, and binoculars.

All air-to-glass lenses and prism surfaces are applied with coatings to improve light transmission. The number of coats, density, and evenness of the coatings are of crucial import in determining light transmission efficiency and image quality such as brightness, clarity, and sharpness.

Although you should remember that there is no industry-standard for what “fully multi-coated” means, there is an acceptance that it’s supposed to be the best of the available types of coatings.

Tip – Fully multi-coated coatings is something you’ll typically see on high-end and premium optics to increase optical performance and value. So, for a low budget Nikon fieldscope to have this quality of coatings, it’s a good sign you might have a great scope.

Q. What are the performance specs of this Nikon?

A. The aperture of the Prostaff 3 is 60 mm. So, although you’re going to have more light gathering capability, you’ll also be getting more weight. But, in comparison of most spotting scopes, it’s still a decent light weight of 21.9 ounces.

Another thing to remember is the exit pupil is only 3.8 mm, so if you’re hoping you’re going to get an optic that’s on par with a night-vision scope, this is not the place to look. But, with fully multi-coated lenses, you might still get brighter images than with another scope with a larger exit pupil and poorer light transmission quality.

The magnification range of the provided eyepiece is 16-48X.

Q. What is the Outfit feature of this fieldscope?

A. What makes this Prostaff 3 qualifiable to have an “Outfit” package is the provided compact tripod and carry case that’s thrown in with the Nikon fieldscope buy.

As a side note, Nikon typically provides a very flimsy, plastic, and barely sufficient tripod. If I were you, I’d invest in a good quality, metal tripod. But, maybe don’t rush into that buy just yet…

As of late in 2016, it seems that hunters are starting to receive metal tripods with their Nikon Prostaff 3 purchase. If Nikon has been listening to customer complaints, then I think the fieldscope’s current rating might just have a hope of nearing the 5 star rating yet.

Q. Is the Prostaff 3 digiscope capable?

A. If this question is a little too techie for you, it can be rephrased to, “Can I attach a camera to it?”, and the sad answer is no.

While this is what you would call a premium entry level fieldscope, it’s still elementary in extra features.

Although it’s fully weatherproof, has fully multi-coated optics with Eco-Glass lenses, and even has some bonus accessories thrown in, you will not be able to attach any type of camera to it.

Nikon Prostaff 3 Spotting Scope Specs:

  • Viewing Configuration: Straight
  • Magnification: 16-48X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Adjustable Eyepieces: Yes
  • Eyepiece included: Yes
  • Objective Diameter: 60 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 10.9 feet
  • Length: 12.3 inches
  • Weight: 21.9 ounces
  • Field of View: 120 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 19 mm/ 3.8 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: Not Listed
  • Focus System: Collar/Single Focus
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Digiscope adaptable: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • 16-48X Integral zoom power for more “reach” that long range hunters could benefit from
  • 60 mm objective lens especially beneficial for hunters looking for lightweight portability and the potential for more low light strength
  • Excellent close focus distance of 10.9 feet with provided zoom eyepiece
  • Fully fog-proof and waterproof to endure all types of weather
  • Compact and lightweight design for extreme portability for hunters on the go
  • Eco-Glass with fully multi-coated optics for sharp and bright images
  • Backed by Nikon’s Limited Lifetime Warranty/Without Electric Components

Rating:

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Nikon Prostaff 5 20-60X82 Angled Review

prostaff-5-20-60x82This Prostaff 5 fieldscope has multi-coated lenses, is fully weatherproof, and it comes with a couple extra perks. It also features the mysterious internal surface texturing and digiscoping read design enigmas.

For its several hundred dollar price tag, it seems to have done extremely well. Online, the reviews have come in on the almost $600 scope, and it’s managed to get a pretty solid rating.

As a high end spotting scope and one of the most popular ones that buyers are lapping up, there’s no doubt why this fieldscope has many featured reviews about it on some of the best Nikon spotting scope reviews, including this one.

But, are these ratings reflective of positive feedback or is the Prostaff 5 really worth almost $600? For a full rundown on what $600 can get you, the Q&A has all the answers to your questions and more!

Prostaff 5 20-60X82 Angled Q&A:

Q. Does this Prostaff 5 have two tripod mount locations?

A. The question is a dead give-away – it does! On the base, you’ll see two mounting threads that are about 2.5 inches apart. But why the second mount?

I answer, “Why not?”. Think about it, if you’re hunting in steep, mountainous, or unpredictable terrain, and you’ve got the perfect location to set up a discrete spot, you’ve got two mounting locations to use.

You’re likely going to need angles that are tough to maintain on a tripod without breaking the mount or it constantly falling out of place. This might just be the one feature about it that actually gets two thumbs up from me.

Q. What is internal surface texturing and digiscoping read design?

A. The features sound awesome, but there’s not much about it online or anywhere. Even more disappointingly, on Nikon’s website, it just says it helps to minimize light loss inside the scope – this part I understand, and I’d understand it better if someone explained to me exactly “how”.

So, I called Nikon US directly. If you’re looking to waste 25 minutes of your life on hold before you ever speak with a human being, call them. I don’t mean to sound harsh, but that could’ve been 25 minutes out in my backyard playing around with my scopes. If I could also post a screenshot of my phone to prove it, it would be here. But alas, I stray, away from my rant and disappointment and back to the scope…

Instead of an in-depth conversation on how this supposed texturing prevents light loss in the optical pathway of the porro prism fieldscope, I was given a ten second explanation of… “it helps with internal focusing when cameras are attached”.

This led me to…

Q. What is digiscoping read design?

A. I still don’t know the exact answer to this, but it has something to do with how well the camera focuses. But, then I was given the impression that the internal texturing and the digiscoping were pretty much the same feature.

If there is an emoji for eye rolling and a ton of question marks, it would be inserted right here. Obviously the “tech” I got didn’t know a thing.

If a better-informed scope expert has some light to shed on these what-could-be-amazing-features, please comment below!

Q. What are the external component perks to the Prostaff 5?

A. There are two notable external perks that are worth mentioning. One of them is the built-in sliding sunshade – great for those angles where you just can’t seem to get rid of the sun.

The second is a removable peep sight. Now you have it, now you don’t – I love the option.

Q. Is this a premium fieldscope?

A. The price range would indicate that it is, however, actual field use and other hunters’ opinions reveal a different story.

This Prostaff 5 is more of a mid-range spotting scope, and its features and quality put it there, except the price suggests a high-end one. Unfortunately for Nikon, they didn’t quite hit it out of the mid-range ballpark with this one.

Where they seemed like they tried to make improvements with features like internal surface texturing and digiscoping read design, they limited the scope’s performance with having only multi-coated lenses instead of fully multi-coated. You should expect to see many high-end features for a scope over $500.

Prostaff 5 20-60X82 Angled Spotting Scope Specs:

  • Viewing Configuration: Angled
  • Magnification: 20-60X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Adjustable Eyepieces: Yes
  • Eyepiece included: Yes
  • Objective Diameter: 82 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: Not Listed
  • Length: 14.88 inches
  • Weight: 40.8 ounces
  • Field of View: 104.8 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: Not Listed/ 4.1-1.4 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Multi-Coated
  • Glass: Not Listed
  • Focus System: Focus Knob/Single Focus
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Digiscope adaptable: Yes

Noteworthy Features:

  • 20-60X zoom power for long range use
  • Two tripod mounting locations for optimal use in any terrain on any angle
  • Fully fog-proof and waterproof to endure all types of weather
  • Multi-coated optics for decent image quality in most conditions
  • Internal surface texture and Digiscoping read design
  • Backed by Nikon’s Limited Lifetime Warranty/Without Electric Components

Rating:

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Nikon EDG Fieldscope 16-48X65 Straight Review

edg-16-48x65This Nikon EDG 65 fieldscope has ED Glass, is Eco-Glass made, and is fully weatherproof. It also has fully multi-coated optics, phase-correction coatings, and dielectric prism coatings.

For a scope that’s over $4000 online, you’d be hard-pressed to find any reviews about a sports optic this expensive amongst hunters.

The EDGs are the flagship line for Nikon’s fieldscopes, and even though the price range is nowhere near practical, I thought it would still be fun to feature it.

For those of you who want to dream with me about owning one of these for your display shelf only – I’m not crazy enough to actually risk getting a scratch on it! – here’s the Q&A to feed your scope craving!

Nikon EDG 65 Q&A:

Q. What type of prismatic refracting fieldscope is this Nikon EDG?

A. This is a roof prism fieldscope, and although it’s not specifically marketed this way, the dielectric prism coatings are a dead give-away.

The fieldscope incorporates a roof prism structure that folds light in the optical pathway to make a more lightweight and compact device.

To improve this fieldscope’s optical performance, it has extra, specially formulated coatings to improve internal surface reflectiveness.

This takes us right into…

Q. What are dielectric prism coatings?

A. In this roof prism fieldscope, there’s one particular surface that isn’t entirely and internally reflective. So typically, it’s coated with a type of metal-based coating to raise its reflectivity, usually silver or aluminum.

But, in very expensive and high-end optics, dielectric-based coatings are used instead to increase the internal surface’s reflectivity to over 99 percent. This is excellent!

You can expect rich color-fidelity and even aberration-free images with the incorporated ED glass technology and fully multi-coated coatings. Bottom line: the image quality is going to be superb, and it should be for over $4000!

Q. What are phase-correction coatings?

A. This fieldscope really has it all, and there isn’t a coating or optical feature that Nikon has missed yet with this EDG 65. So, I should take a second to mention the phase-correction coatings on this optic.

With all roof prism devices, some light loss and out-of-phase light-waves are inevitable, despite how perfect and precise the prism assembly is. So, to keep light loss to a minimum and light-waves in-phase, a phase-correction coating is used on the prism surfaces to maintain this.

Color fidelity of the entire light spectrum is maintained and you should see high-contrast and high-resolution images just as brilliantly in the center of your view as you do on the outer edges of your field of view.

Q. What are EDG eyepieces?

A. For this EDG 65, there are seven available eyepieces. The one that’s provided in the purchase is the zoom 16-48X, and it has an excellent close focus distance of 10.8 feet.

Now the other six EDG eyepieces are going to be listed in this particular Nikon spotting scope review according to its magnification range, not to the product name listed on the Nikon website.

The remaining six eyepieces are fixed magnifications and are: 16X, 20X, 24X, 30X, 40X, and 60X.

Q. Are there other EDG models available?

A. Within the EDG series, there is the the 65 mm and the 85 mm models that are both available in either straight or angled.

There is another upgraded version of the EDG series, and that’s the EDG VR line.

Q. How much does this Nikon fieldscope cost?

A. That’s a great question! Retail price for the EDG 65 is about $3200! Yes, that’s expensive! The confusing part is, online, it’s retailing for $4400! That’s about the price of a really nice, used pick-up for our next hunting trip versus a new scope.

EDG 65 Straight Spotting Scope Specs:

  • Viewing Configuration: Angled
  • Magnification: 16-48X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Adjustable Eyepieces: Yes
  • Eyepiece included: Yes
  • Objective Diameter: 65 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 10.8
  • Length: Not Listed
  • Weight: Not Listed
  • Field of View: 160.8-78.7 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 18.4-16.5 mm/ 4.1-1.4 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: Not Listed
  • Focus System: Focus Knob/Single Focus
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Digiscope adaptable: Yes

Noteworthy Features:

  • Fully multi-coated coatings for optimum light transmission
  • Phase-correction coatings to maintain in-phase light-waves and color resolution
  • Dielectric prism coatings for maximum internal reflectivity
  • Fully fog-proof and waterproof to endure all types of weather
  • Lead and arsenic free with Eco-Glass components
  • Extra-Low Dispersion glass for minimized chromatic aberrations in high-contrast environments
  • Seven available EDG eyepieces
  • Backed by Nikon’s Limited Lifetime Warranty/Without Electric Components

Rating:

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Nikon EDG VR 20-60X85 Fieldscope Review

edg-vr-20-60x85This out-of-your-world EDG VR 85 has image stabilization, ED Glass, fully multi-coated optics, and is fully weatherproof.

Like the EDG 65 mentioned above, there’s very few hunters who are willing to spend in the thousands for a fieldscope. But surprisingly, there is one online review about this device, and they gave it a double thumbs up. But, we’ll see how ratings go in the future as more dare to spend in this price range.

As the top-of-the-line fieldscope for Nikon, I had to make some room to feature it here. Not even the very best Nikon spotting scope reviews would be complete without it.

So, what makes it the creme de la creme scope of the Nikon line-up? You’ll have to read the Q&A to find the answer to that.

Nikon EDG VR 85 Q&A:

Q. What does VR stand for?

A. Vibration Reduction. This is the one outstanding feature of the EDG VR that sets it apart from its EDG counterpart. Apparently, Nikon was the first manufacturer in the world to develop a fieldscope with lens-adjusting image stabilization.

All external movements from user use to weather elements like wind, will cause that annoying image shaking that significantly slows down target acquisition, let alone, making it practically impossible to see, to cease.

Q. How does VR work?

A. There are two sensors in the scope called Angular Velocity sensors. Their job is to detect any vertical and horizontal movements, and together, they can also detect diagonal movement.

Once movement has been detected, they then signal the Voice Coil Motors to activate the VR system to stop the shaking. When the VR is turned on, it can detect movement every 1/1000 of a second.

The result is a still, shake-free image that’s providing 88 percent more image stability than a conventional spotting scope.

Q. What is the EDG 85 VR’s power source?

A. For about 17 hours of use, you’re going to go through four AA batteries. On top of the already heifer of a scope, adding in battery weight and spare batteries is going to leave you with a crick in your back.

Q. Is this fieldscope practical for hunting?

A. This is a flat out “No”. Although the optical precision and quality is something to envy when you’re out in the field just trying to get a clear view, it’s not going to be portable, as much as a spotting scope can be, to take with you on a hunt.

Against it is also the cost. The astronomical cost of about $6000 on Nikon’s website and even the approx. $4400 price from other online retailers is more than most hunters will ever spend on one optic.

So, what would it be suitable for? Wildlife photography. This is an excellent optic if you’re just in it for the hunt of that one moment.

EDG VR 85 Spotting Scope Specs:

  • Viewing Configuration: Straight
  • Magnification: 20-60X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Adjustable Eyepieces: Yes
  • Eyepiece included: Yes
  • Objective Diameter: 82 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 16.5
  • Length: 14.9 inches
  • Weight: 84.66 ounces
  • Field of View: 124.7-62.3 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 18.4-16.5 mm/ 4.3-1.4 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: Not Listed
  • Focus System: Focus Knob/Dual Focus
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Digiscope adaptable: Yes

Noteworthy Features:

  • VR technology to reduce shaking by 88% versus conventional fieldscope
  • Easy On/Off VR system powered by 4 AA batteries
  • Fully multi-coated coatings for optimum light transmission
  • Phase-correction coatings to maintain in-phase light-waves and color resolution
  • Dielectric prism coatings for maximum internal reflectivity
  • Fully fog-proof and waterproof to endure all types of weather
  • Lead and arsenic free with Eco-Glass components
  • Extra-Low Dispersion glass for minimized chromatic aberrations in high-contrast environments
  • Seven available EDG eyepieces
  • Backed by Nikon’s Limited Lifetime Warranty/With Electric Components

Rating:

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Which is the Best Nikon Spotting Scope for You?

Nikon’s fieldscope line-up takes us from the low $300 prices to the whopping $6000 out-of-your-budget range! But, it’s clear which popular fieldscopes will appropriately serve the true hunter while out in the field.

The $300 Prostaff 3 is the most basic and affordable device featured in this Nikon review. It’ll hold up well, but it’s not camera adaptable.

Not surprisingly, the Nikon Fieldscope 13-30X50 has every recommendation I have for Nikon buyers. It has all the upgrades without any unnecessary extras complicating its use.

Even though it doesn’t have the reviewer base to support this recommendation, it really is the ultimate tool for the hunter who doesn’t want to pay over 100 percent more for only a 10 percent upgrade.

Now, on the other hand, the one fieldscope that did have a decent review base seemed to bomb when it came to the high-end factor…

It’s no secret that the Prostaff 5 isn’t my favorite fieldscope, but I’m not going to say that it isn’t going to perform well. The lack of having any available and accurate information on the supposed high-tech features that kick its alleged value over $500 outweighs any interest I have in recommending it.

Alas, we come to the EDG fieldscopes – the pride and joy of this Nikon optic category. For on-the-move hunting, I’m not recommending them, although the EDG 65 would be the better pick of the two. But, for wildlife observing and photography, you’re going to have a blast!

Nikon: Innovation & Quality

Nikon has been around for ages, and often, they’re typically thought of as a second-tier brand. But, with their innovative VR technology that has set the standard for the world and their continued excellence in glass and image quality, they certainly have the potential to play among the big boys in optics.