Burris Rifle Scope Reviews: Droptine, Fullfield & Eliminator

If you’re on a working man’s budget when you’re in the market for a new rifle scope, then I’ve got some affordable options for you today. You won’t be limited to only a few options, you won’t have to compromise on features or quality, and you won’t be tricked into paying extra for warranties or the like.

You can seriously have it all for a low-cost price. From parallax adjustable scopes to ballistic reticles and reinforced spring tension systems, all equipped with fully multi-coated lenses, there’s no reason for you to look any further than this Burris rifle scope review. We are going to check out the:

This rifle scope review is about Burris Optics and what this American company contributes to the novice shooter and the fanatic hunter. If you’ve been hustling Google for economical or even cheap rifle scopes without giving up your expectations for quality, then you’ve probably also come across Redfield.

If you like what they had to offer, chances are, you’re going to love what Burris has in store for you. Word has it that Burris Optics founder, Don Burris, used to work for Redfield. In fact, many of the innovative product designs of the now Leupold-owned company is all thanks to Don.

Burris Rifle Scope Reviews

Burris Optics is known for their large, no – scratch that, their huge line of various types of scopes for shooters of all ilk – elk too. If you’ve decided on a Burris rifle scope, you may have only fought half the battle in the decision-buying process. You might get lost in the sea of scopes they have shelved for you. So, let me help you narrow down some models that might just peak your interest.

The Burris Optics rifle scopes all have Hi-Lume fully multi-coated lens for the best clarity and light transmission possible. There is nothing less than the best when it comes to their glass.

They also use quad rings for water-tightness and fog-proof abilities that far exceed the standard O rings used today. I’ve also got a word or two to say about Burris’ double enforced spring tension system that will hold up to recoil like you’ve never seen before.

Burris Droptine 3-9X40 Review

burris-droptine-riflescope-with-ballistic-plex-reticle-droptine-3-9x40The Burris Droptine 3-9X40 rifle scope is the most affordable scope in this review, and one of the newest. Even though it has a budget-friendly price tag, it has exactly what you need to fill your tag this hunting season. A solid rating online keeps consumers like you rolling in and buying up.

Admittedly, the Droptine rifle scope nearly lost its place in this review. When comparing it to the older, but very popular Fullfield II scope, I thought the Fullfield was the clear winner. But… the slight differences between the two ended up being worth it to write about the both of them.

As a high performing, low budget scope it has excellent value for the hunter who wants to save a few bucks but wants to go home big on quality.

For the shooter and hunter who wants the lowest price possible with the highest performance power, this Q&A is for you.

Droptine 3-9X40 Rifle Scope Q&A:

Q. Is there another reticle available with the Droptine scope?

A. This Burris rifle scope has the Ballistic Plex reticle which is a simple, easy to use, and uncluttered designed reticle. It’s the duplex style with three stadia lines on the elevation cross hair below the center point for trajectory holdovers for known distances.

The neat thing about the Droptine is it also has another reticle available that’s been specifically calibrated for .22 LR ammunition – the Ballistic Plex 22LR reticle. When the rifle scope uses the regular Ballistic Plex reticle, the parallax is set for 100 yards for typical centerfire bullets. You can calibrate your rifle scope with any cartridge and bullet weight for any bullet for the ballistic reticle.

When using rimfire 22LR bullets with the Ballistic Plex 22LR reticle the parallax is set for 50 yards. So, if you’re mostly going to be using the scope on a .22 rifle while you’re keeping the hordes of rabbits, rodents, and other varmints away, the specially calibrated reticle was made for you.

Q. Is this model the exact same scope as the Fullfield II?

A. While they are exactly the same in physical dimensions, optical quality, and durable and rugged construction, there are some differences that you might find benefit the one or the other. The first is the two rifle scopes have different style turrets.

The Droptine is a closer cousin to the newer Fullfield E1 rifle scope with the heavy knurling design, which is very popular among hunters. In fact, we hunters all prefer the heavily knurled turrets and power pieces for better gripping and easier rotations.

The Fullfield II has a more subtle and sleek knurling design that really can’t be compared to the Droptine. Another difference is in the eyepiece and power ring. The Droptine features these two parts of the scope as separate pieces.

Many users prefer this feature because the focus isn’t being accidentally messed with when putting on and taking off caps. Other than that, the Droptine is about $50 less than the Fullfield II.

Q. Does Burris have a ballistics software program?

A. The Burris Droptine 3-9X40 mm rifle scope with the Ballistics Plex or the Ballistics Plex 22LR reticle is compatible with the Burris Ballistics software program online. This is worth mentioning since it’s a new software program that Burris has recently released, and there seems to be a lot of confusion still as to how to properly use the ballistic reticles.

It’s super easy to use – just enter in the scope you want, the ammunition info, and the relevant sea level/elevation and atmospheric numbers and you’ll be given your distances for each mark on the reticle.

Q. What type of hunting can the Droptine scope be used for?

A. This 3-9X40 mm rifle scope has excellent specs as a basic and entry level scope for big game hunting, predator hunting, and varmint and small game hunting. For the shooter who wants an all-purpose scope for while you’re in the forest or out in the fields where bullet trajectory matters, the Droptine with the ballistic plex reticle is a great scope to get it done.

If you’re using the Droptine with the ballistic plex 22LR reticle, please just stick to varmint hunting or plinking on a Summer afternoon.

Burris Droptine 3-9X40 Specs:

  • Magnification: 3-9X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Objective Diameter: 40 mm
  • Length/Weight/Tube Diameter: 12.2 inches/13 ounces/1 inch
  • Field of View: 33 – 13 feet/100 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 3.1 – 3.8 mm/13 – 5 mm
  • Reticle: Ballistic Plex, Ballistic Plex 22LR
  • Adjustment Info: 1/4 MOA/Click
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Finish: Black Matte
  • Waterproof/Shockproof: Yes/Yes
  • Parallax Setting: 100/50 yards
  • Airgun rated: No
  • Illuminated Reticle: No
  • Mounting Rings Included: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • 3-9X zoom for the most common power for versatile hunting conditions
  • Ballistic Plex or Ballistic Plex 22LR reticles available
  • Access to the new Burris Ballistics Tools online software
  • Knurling on turrets and power piece for easy and positive rotations
  • Waterproof and fog-proof with quad-seal gas rings for superior durability
  • Light-weight at only 13 ounces, and 12 inches long to fit most mounting systems
  • Burris’ HiLume Multi-coated lens for ultimate clarity and light transmission
  • Recoilproof with double spring tension assembly to keep your zero even under heavy recoil and shock
  • Suitable for varmint, predator, and big game hunting
  • Backed by Burris Forever Warranty

Rating:

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Burris Fullfield II 3-9X40 Review

burris-3-9-x-40mm-fullfield-ii-ballistic-plex-rifle-scopeThe Burris Fullfield II 3-9X40 mm rifle scope with the Ballistic Plex reticle is your varmint and small game, predator, or African plains hunting rifle scope. It’ll take you from the hot sands of the African deserts to the tundras of Alaska and back. It has a great rating and plenty of customers gave it a top mark.

Online there’s dozens of people sharing their opinion about this roughly $180 scope. And, there’s more yet said about it on other Burris scope reviews. If you want a highly recommended and inexpensive Burris rifle scope, you’ve hit the jackpot.

Honestly, this rifle scope wasn’t in my original list for review. As stated above, I nearly dropped the newer Droptine from this review just to include this older, tried, and maybe soon to-be-outdated scope, but then I thought “why not just throw it in?”.

There was compelling evidence for me to review this rifle scope, and exhibit A was a forum that had almost 300 reviews of the Fullfield II, with a superb rating of 4.6 stars. You’ll also keep seeing this specific model pop up all over the place when you’re looking for the best Burris rifle scopes. So in the end, I couldn’t deny the high praises of the strong Fullfield community that stands behind the cheap-priced but quality scope.

Sometimes “old school” is what’s cool.

So, what has everyone all excited about the Fullfield II? The Q&A will answer your questions and anything else you mightn’t have thought to ask.

Fullfield II 3-9X40 Rifle Scope Q&A:

Q. Will the Fullfield II hold up to recoil?

A. Not just the Fullfield II, but all of Burris’ rifle scopes are made with a dual spring system for ultimate recoil control. The typical system in most conventional rifle scopes is the single leaf spring system that has served the hunting and shooting community well over the years. But, these bad boys have double spring tension assemblies that have been tried, tested, and put through the ringer.

So, will it hold up on hundreds of rounds on your AR or your .300 Savage – yes! In fact, if you’re shooting anything less powerful than a limb-ripping .50 BMG, you know – the .50 Browning Machine Gun bullet that was designed to take down military tanks, you’re covered.

Q. Where are Burris rifle scopes made?

A. While Burris Optics is an American company, they went through a difficult economic time during the first decade of the 21st century. While labor, raw materials, and plant costs rose over 40 percent during this time, they kept their cheaper line of scopes, including the Fullfield II series, in the affordable price range of around $200. They were forced to either reduce the quality of the scopes or discontinue the cheaper lines altogether.

Neither was an acceptable option, so they kept the same quality standards and outsourced the manufacturing to the Philippines. Quality control, final testing, packaging, final inspection, and customer service and warranty fulfillment is all still completed out of their headquarters in Colorado, USA.

Q. What are the differences between the Fullfield II and the Fullfield E1?

A. The Fullfield series is the bread and butter line of rifle scopes for Burris. They’re affordable, equipped with enough bells and whistles, and they have enough of an established consumer base that can spread the word on what’s good and what’s not.

The Fullfield E1 is the newest series addition to the Fullfield line. The E1 has the larger and very accentuated grooves in the turrets for easier gripping. The other difference is noted in its name – E1, which stands for Enhanced 1 reticle.

It’s very different, and it has a set up better suited for cross wind trajectories. However, I think the downside as to why people aren’t crazy about the E1 reticle is because it doesn’t go right to the edges of the field of view. The Fullfield II that has the Ballistic Plex reticle keeps it simple and non-distracting.

The Fullfield also costs about $100 less. Almost everything else is the same. The other differences will be discussed in the following questions.

Q. How is the power ring and eyepiece set up on the Fullfield II?

A. This Burris scope must have an old school style set up where the eyepiece and power ring are one in the same. Burris says this feature is a simple and integrative system, but it must be outdated because I’ve never come across this before.

I can see how this “integrative system” can be troublesome every time caps are put on or taken off or focus changes slightly because of zooming changes. But, the upside to the fast fast focus eyepiece is it’s capable of fast target acquisition each time you change the power range.

But, because of the fast focus eyepiece you can’t lock it into place to keep your focus which can be cumbersome if it gets out of focus every time you change zooming power. Hmm, vicious cycle…

This is a very different system compared to the separate eyepiece for focus and the power ring for magnifying range being two separate parts that is the norm and the standard today. So, it just depends on how much this is going to be an issue for you. With all the raving reviews online, it doesn’t seem to bother most people.

Q. Does this scope have zero-reset turrets?

A. This Burris rifle scope is not marketed to have zero reset turrets per se, but according to their User Guides, you can reset your zero after you’ve sighted in with the Fullfield II rifle scope. Though, what’s interesting about the E1 is since it has the very nice, large, and knurly turrets, you’d think you’d be able to reset your zero easily.

Unfortunately, it seems they’re either too stiff to reset or just plain won’t do it. Boo.

Burris Fullfield II 3-9X40 Specs:

  • Magnification: 3-9X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Objective Diameter: 40 mm
  • Length/Weight/Tube Diameter: 12.2 inches/13 ounces/1 inch
  • Field of View: 33 – 13 feet/100 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 3.1 – 3.8 mm/13 – 5 mm
  • Reticle: Plex, Ballistic Plex
  • Adjustment Info: 1/4 MOA/Click
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Finish: Black Matte, Nickel
  • Waterproof/Shockproof: Yes/Yes
  • Parallax Setting: 100 yards
  • Airgun rated: No
  • Illuminated Reticle: No
  • Mounting Rings Included: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • 3-9X zoom for the most common power for versatile hunting conditions
  • Plex or Ballistic Plex available
  • Access to the new Burris Ballistics Tools online software
  • Simple and integrative one-piece focus and power ring
  • Waterproof and fog-proof with quad-seal gas rings for superior durability
  • Light-weight at only 13 ounces, and 12 inches long to fit most mounting systems
  • Burris’ HiLume Multi-coated lens for ultimate clarity and light transmission
  • Recoilproof with double spring tension assembly to keep your zero even under heavy recoil and shock
  • Suitable for varmint, predator, and African plains hunting
  • Backed by Burris Forever Warranty

Rating:

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Burris Eliminator III 4-16X50 Rangefinding Rifle Scope Review

burris-200116-eliminator-4-16-x-50-x-96-scope-blackThe Burris Eliminator III 4-16X50 rifle scope is indeed one of the most advanced tactical and hunting rifle scopes on the market. If you thought that Burris was only in the optics industry to pop out quality, affordable scopes, you’d be wrong.

They dabble in world-class technology to combine the functionality of laser rangefinders and rifle scopes to make a superior product that’s worth every dollar. Since its release date a couple years ago, this rifle scope is holding a fantastic rating online. With all the nifty features it has, it’s not losing it’s high star rating any time soon.

There were so many great and effective Burris rifle scopes I could have picked for this spot on this review. Between the AR rifle scopes, Predator Quest, Scout, XTR II, and the Veracity scopes, it was a tooth grinding decision.

In the end, it wasn’t just about the fact that I wanted to write about the Eliminator III, I felt obligated. There’s so many mind-blowing things this scope can do that it would be a crime to you avid hunters if I didn’t make you aware of it in the best Burris scope review right here.

While this rifle scope looks more like a submarine from out of space than a sleek and compact optic, don’t let its less than appealing aesthetic value turn you off.

Here’s the Q&A to give you a run down of how cool this scope can be. And, since this one scope is deserving of a full article in itself, make sure you check out the bullet listed features to get a full review of everything the Eliminator III has to offer.

Eliminator III 4-16X50 Rifle Scope Q&A:

Q. How do I use the rangefinding LaserScope?

A. On a conventional and traditional rangefinder, all you have to do to get the distance is aim and press. The same is true of the Eliminator III rifle scope. There’s a button that’s located towards the front of the scope or the objective bell on both sides of the scope that you press to get a display reading of the distance.

This button is called the On/Range button. By pressing it, the correct aiming dot on the reticle will illuminate, the distance, and the windage offset will be displayed that automatically takes out the guesswork for bullet drop compensation.

Q. Is there a remote control with this model?

A. Yes there is. When the Eliminator III first came out there wasn’t a remote control available. However, new to 2016, Burris came out with a Remote Cable Switch that activates the On/Range button from any comfortable and convenient position you may be stalking or lying in. The flexible cable is 14-24 inches long.

Pretty nifty, right? You will have to pay a couple hundred bucks more for this model though. Otherwise, if you’re good with the button on the scope, why spend extra?

Q. What are all the numbers displayed on the lens?

A. The illuminated values on the Burris Eliminator III are all important bits of information for you to make that well-placed, long distance shot. The most obvious is the large set of numbers in the top center of the lens – the distance to the target in either meters or yards.

The letter displayed to the top left of this number will be the letter representing your measurement setting – Y for yards and M for meters. On the very top right of the lens is a battery life indicator, and the value to the left of this is the 10 mph windage offset value.

Q. What is the 10 MPH Windage Offset?

A. This value that’s displayed to the right of the lens tells you how many dots to hold into the wind based on a 10 mph wind and your specific cartridge for the known distance to the target. The windage feature on this rifle scope isn’t fully automated.

You’ll need to use the windage offset value displayed on the lens and use it with the most accurate estimation of current wind speeds as a guide line to see how many dots you need to holdover. The aiming holdover dot on the reticle will be illuminated, and with your windage estimations you’ll calculate a new windage corrected aiming point.

Q. How far out can the scope range?

A. The LaserScope Eliminator III can zero into targets out to 1200 yards and beyond. Some hunters even say 1800 yards. While the scope can range out that far, it doesn’t mean that you should. Ethical and moral hunting these extreme long distances on live targets depends on a lot factors including caliber and bullet coefficients and atmospheric conditions.

Long range hunting isn’t and shouldn’t be for everyone. It takes a lot of practice, practice, practice to even shoot well-placed shots out to 1200 yards. But, with a scope of this caliber, a powerful rifle, and loads of ammunition that make for a match made in heaven, getting lots of that extreme range practice on steel or paper targets is still a thrill in and of itself.

Q. What is the X96 reticle?

A. This reticle is an advanced ballistic but simple as can be reticle for the Eliminator III. It has windage dots that span the lower half of the lens, yet the cross hairs don’t span the entire field of view. It’s about as uncluttered as you can get for such an innovative reticle. And, get this – you can also use it at any magnification range, not just full power. Out of 27 Burris reticles, this one is pretty neat.

Q. Is there an actual projected laser beam?

A. No. This rifle scope works on laser technology, the same technology that rangefinders are outfitted with. The scope uses the laser system to emit non-visible wavelength light to reflect off a target. That reflected and then refracted light is detected by the rangefinder in the rifle scope.

No actual laser beam is seen to be projected from the scope by the human eye. Of course accurate distances will depend on many things like the reflectivity of the target or surface, distance, angle, and many other factors.

Q. How practical is the Burris scope for hunting?

A. With confidence that this rifle scope is listed in practically all of the hunting categories on the Burris website as a hunting rifle scope, I’m sure it’ll do just fine. My only concern is it’s just more of a really cool tac scope or super extreme long ranging scope versus an actual hunting scope for first shot kills.

Whether or not 500 yards or 1200 yards is your ethical long range distance, this model is one of the closest scopes to enabling you to become an instant long range hunter without spending all the man hours at the range or boat loads of ammunition. Repeating over and over again that practice, the right equipment, confidence, and caution for long distance hunting at these ranges can never be overemphasized.

Burris Eliminator III 4-16X50 Specs:

  • Magnification: 4-16X
  • Power Variability: Variable
  • Objective Diameter: 50 mm
  • Length/Weight/Tube Diameter: 15.5 inches/30.4 ounces/1 inch
  • Field of View: 33 – 13 feet/100 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 3.1 – 3.8 mm/13 – 5 mm
  • Reticle: Plex, Ballistic Plex
  • Adjustment Info: 1/4 MOA/Click
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Finish: Black Matte, Nickel
  • Waterproof/Shockproof: Yes/Yes
  • Parallax Setting: 50 yards+
  • Airgun rated: No
  • Illuminated Reticle: Yes
  • Mounting Rings Included: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • 4X zoom for long range hunting in vast and open environments
  • X96 ballistic and laser rangefinder reticle
  • Built-in rangefinding technology to get you precise distances with ease and without lugging around extra equipment
  • Built-in integrative inclinometer to compensate for angle shots uphill or downhill
  • Ballistic reticle works on any magnification range
  • Access to the new Burris Ballistics Tools online software
  • Adjustable objective for parallax adjustment correction
  • Waterproof and fog-proof with quad-seal gas rings for superior durability
  • Weatherproof in -15 to +122 degrees Fahrenheit conditions
  • Illuminated dot with push button control and with 5 brightness settings
  • Remote Cable Switch for On/Range control from any position within 14-24 inches with the 200119 model
  • Burris’ HiLume Multi-coated lens for ultimate clarity and light transmission
  • Recoilproof with double spring tension assembly to keep your zero even under heavy recoil and shock
  • Practical scope that can be mounted to any Picatinny or Weaver base
  • Suitable for varmint, predator, and African plains hunting
  • Backed by Burris Forever Warranty

Rating:

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Which is the Best Burris Rifle Scope for You?

The 3-9X40 mm scopes were popular today, and they’re conveniently in the right price range for the hunter who wants to extend his frugal penny-pinching skills in this department. The Droptine is a great all-round rifle scope for the hunter and shooter who want to take down some serious targets in their comfort zone. If you’re looking for no-nonsense, clear glass, and an attractive price tag, there’s plenty of Droptines to buy.

But, let’s not forget that people like you who are in the market to buy Burris scopes like ratings – that’s why you’re reading this today. If you like what everyone has to say about the affordable Fullfield II, then you’re out the door with this rifle scope. If you wouldn’t mind spending a few bucks more, the E1 is a great upgrade if you wanted to stay in the Fullfield family.

And finally, a word or two on the beastly but fully decked-out Eliminator III… Despite the crazy range specs of this Burris scope, I couldn’t not include it because of all the fan hits on this scope online. For being over $1000, it sure has a huge consumer base. It might just be worth waiting to nab one when it comes on sale – if you’re crazy enough to push this thing to its limits.

Be Pack Leader with a Burris Scope

Burris really hits it out of the ball park with all the various options of scopes, reticles, and mounting systems it has. For all the products they have to satisfy the demand of the amateur rookie to the seasoned veteran, the Burris website is worth mentioning here.

It was one of the easiest and most organized optics websites I’ve come across. They have such a large inventory that they’re forced to categorize each rifle scope into types of hunting activities. This was a well-done move to show off what scopes were built to perform well in various hunting environments to narrow down which Burris scopes you should buy.

Furthermore, each reticle also has a full listing of each rifle scope that has the availability of that reticle. With a user-friendly website, Burris sure leads the pack to the bait.