Redfield Binoculars Review: Are You a Rebel or a Renegade?

If you’ve saved up enough bucks to get yourself a really nice low budget binocular, then Redfield is where you should lay it on down. They don’t offer a huge inventory when you only need a few exceptional and unmatched optics within its class.

To really get to know Redfield, we’ll get into how they keep their binos simple, classy, and affordable with their fully multi-coated lenses and waterproof and fog-proof abilities with unsurpassed BAK4 prism glass. In this Redfield binoculars review we will check out their:

Redfield’s motto seems to be along the lines of giving the hunter an unparalleled visionary experience for blue-collar prices that’s impossible to beat.

Now, what’s so great about Redfield?

Who are Redfield?

Back in the day when they were nearly forced to close their doors, they struck the jackpot when Leupold & Stevens snagged them up in a bankruptcy deal (I got this straight from the horse’s mouth).

Not long after that, the American Leupold & Stevens created more jobs increasing total Redfield employment to nearly 700 people which I’m sure has had an upward trend since then.

Because of this, Redfield has access to Leupold’s world-renown binocular experts, unequaled optics technology, and superior warranties for the best prices you’ll ever see for their quality binoculars. They also boosted the lives of employees and the economy of the American North West.

Redfield Binocular Reviews

If you’re looking to buy Redfield binoculars without paying typical Leupold prices, then the Rebel, Renegade, and Battlefield binos are for you.

Other than the fact that they’re all Nitrogen filled, tripod adaptable, and they come with extra accessories thrown in, they’re also made with BAK4 prism glass that’s made to Leupold’s custom quality standards.

Redfield Rebel 10X42 Review

redfield-rebel-10x42This Redfield Rebel 10X42 has everything you want to see in an entry level binocular. This includes the fully waterproof and fog-proof feature, fully multi-coated coatings, and BAK4 prism glass on a fully armored aluminum body.

Consumers have gone nuts over the $130 (approx.) Rebel… it must be something about the “bad boy” rebel attraction. There’s plenty of reviewers online that have fallen in love with these binoculars. Now that’s deserving of a cat call.

As the most talked about binocular in the entire Redfield series with its run away ratings, this Rebel is not only deserving of being mentioned in this Redfield binocular review, it’s also worthy of being mentioned first.

I know you’re anxious to get right into the depths of this Q&A – so please, don’t let me stop you.

Rebel 10X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What kind of prism glass does Redfield use on the Rebel binocular?

A. This Rebel binocular, and every other Redfield binocular, is built with BAK4 prism glass. Did you expect anything different? More impressively, every Leupold binocular is built with BAK4 prism glass too.

When Leupold builds quality binoculars, there’s no dealing with anything that can possibly be less than the best.

Additionally, I was really curious about the quality of the BAK4 prism glass, so I called Redfield/Leupold & Stevens. It seems that they take their glass manufacturing very seriously and they don’t even bother with what the internet says about BAK4 standards.

They have their own custom quality standards that they expect to be fulfilled by every one of their manufacturing contractors.

To ensure that every single lens is upheld to their high standard, they undergo a vigorous quality control procedure before it’s ever put into a box to be shipped out to you.

Q. How far out does this Rebel see out to?

A. There’s no official distance that’s advertised with this specific Rebel. But, the good news is, there’s been a lot of input about its ranging capabilities. With lots of people throwing in their review online and with it being used in the hands of real life hunters, sea men, and safari tourists, it’s been tested in nearly every field you can imagine.

According to real life use, expect to see it perform for every distance that you need for hunting.

If you’re deer hunting in sub-250 yard distances, this will be an excellent optic. If you’re thinking more along the lines of long range viewing in 400-600 yards, this is still a good choice.

You will also be able to take this thing out to 1000 yards and still get the scoop on the far-away herd. Whether or not you shoot at these distances, I’m not here to debate that, but if you want to see out that far, your bino will get you there. By the way, its close focus distance is a very nice 4.3 feet.

Q. Does the Rebel come with any accessories?

A. Absolutely! Leupold includes a soft case, lens covers for each lens, and a neoprene neck strap. That’s everything you need to properly tote and stow your bino with ease. You could replace these accessories with higher quality ones if you wanted to, but why when these do the job just fine? Besides…

Everyone gets excited seeing a few extra bonus items in the box when it arrives. And, even if you don’t show your excitement publicly, don’t worry, I’ll keep your little secret… you know, that victory dance you do when you think no one’s looking because you saved a few bucks and still got some extras thrown in?

Yeah… you know exactly what I’m talking about.

Q. What Redfield binoculars are current and which ones are discontinued?

A. Now, if you ever intend to sift through Redfield’s binocular inventory, just be prepared to be a little confused. According to the binocular homepage, there are only five models that are currently available.

The Rebel 8X32 and 10X42. The Renegade 10X36 and 10X50. And lastly, the Battlefield 10X42.

Now, here’s the tricky part. If you compare all the specs expecting to see these five models compared, you’ll actually get more than you bargained for. In addition to the above-listed binos, Redfield also gives spec comparisons for six more discontinued models.

While the additional info may seem unnecessary since they’re discontinued products, Redfield through Amazon and other independent retailers are still selling what they have on their shelves until they’re out.

This is when the techs and specs available through the Redfield website still comes in handy. For those of you who might want to give a different magnification+objective lens size combo a try, the recently discontinued line offers a variety.

The discontinued Rebels are the 8X25, 10X25, 8X42, and 10X50. The discontinued Renegades are the 8X36 and 7X50. Knowing this will make all the difference when shopping to buy Redfield binoculars online or at the store.

Q. Where are the Redfield Rebel binoculars made?

A. The Rebel binoculars are made in China. You’ll see this clearly printed on the binocular in small letters. But, don’t let this discourage you from buying a pair of the Rebel, Renegades, or Battlefield binoculars for three reasons.

The first is that Leupold has strict and high quality standards that their optics manufacturing contractors have to fulfill.

The second reason is cost. By outsourcing the manufacturing, you get the cheaper cost when you’re ready to “add to cart”.

And, the last reason is warranty. Leupold & Stevens backs their products with their warranties, and the Redfield binocular line is no exception to the rule. If you need a repair or a replacement, you’re not dealing with China, you’re working with the American Leupold & Stevens company.

And, if you know anything about anything, you’d know that Leupold is revered for their customer service and their excellent warranty fulfillment’s.

Redfield Rebel 10X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 4.3 feet
  • Dimensions: 7 x 6 x 3 inches
  • Weight: 26.4 ounces
  • Field of View: 341 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 16.3 mm/4 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups for a fast and custom fit
  • Tripod adaptable for long range viewing and steady handling
  • BAK4 prism glass for superior and brilliant image quality
  • Fully multi-coated lenses for ultimate light transmission potential and pristine images
  • Also available in 8X32 model
  • Fully 100% waterproof and fog-proof for ultimate weatherproof-ability
  • Durable fully armored aluminum body for a robust build and secure gripping
  • Comes with a neoprene neck strap, lens covers, and soft case
  • Backed by Redfield’s Limited Lifetime Guarantee

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Redfield Renegade 10X50 Review

redfield-renegade-10x50This roughly $100 Redfield Renegade 10X50 binocular has fully multi-coated large 50 mm objective lenses that sits on a fully waterproof and fog-proof aluminum body. Its twist up eye cups, center focus system, and BAK4 prisms are well-made on the low budget porro prism binocular.

This Redfield binocular has left a stunning impression with its hunting crowd. This is obvious with the solid near perfect rating it currently has with a decently sized reviewer base.

But, as only one of two porro prism binoculars in the entire Redfield line, and also the entire Leupold line at that, what makes you think you should go this route when you’re ready to buy Redfield binoculars online? Let this Q&A be your answering guide.

Renegade 10X50 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What are the advantages of the porro prism on this Redfield binocular?

A. As you might already know, the porro prism design has the old-fashioned, offset eyepiece-to-objective lens set up. While it sometimes gets the shaft when compared to the roof prism design, there are actually some optical benefits and strengths to choose a porro over a roof prism binocular.

The main advantage of why a porro prism bino can be optically superior to a roof prism bino is because light requires only four reflections instead of six in the porro. This minimizes light loss.

Additionally, porro prisms don’t need mirror coatings or phase correction coatings to make it an excellent optic like roof prisms do. Light reflections occur simply in a “Z”-like pattern with no phase shifting.

They may also offer a richer depth of field with 3D-like images and a wider field of view over a roof prism. For example, this porro prism Renegade 10X50 bino has a field of view at 1000 yards of 347 feet. The roof prism Rebel 10X50 bino has a field of view at 1000 yards of 284 feet. Enough said.

The only downside is that this porro prism bino is heavy because of the “Z” shaped optical light path that requires a larger frame be built. This Renegade also weighs in at a beefy 31.3 ounces.

Q. What quality level are the lens coatings on the binocular?

A. All of Redfield’s binoculars have the fully multi-coated coatings. Obviously, Redfield doesn’t take short cuts when it comes to their optics. Fully multi-coated coatings are the best in their category.

Although these are the low budget scopes of the parent company, Leupold, they’re still treated with the best level of coatings to ensure you’re getting top-dollar quality optics.

The purpose of fully multi-coated coatings is to provide the most optimal environment for light to pass through the optic versus single or just coated lenses.

But, for the average hunter, there’s really no way to test if the coatings were applied evenly and at the right thickness. You’re at the mercy of trusting the manufacturer.

Fortunately, Leupold is a company with integrity and their quality control procedures require the utmost best when it comes to the coating process. You know you can trust them because Leupold is respected for their bright optics and image quality for excellent prices.

This “brightness” that they’re known for comes from very high light transmission rates thanks to their coatings. No blotchiness, glare, and light reflections here.

Q. Is this a good low light hunting binocular?

A. Now that you know all about fully multi-coated optics, you should be able to guess that these are going to be, at the very least, good for low light hunting. This Renegade also has large 50 mm objective lenses and a 5 mm exit pupil. Now, that “good” just got upgraded to an “excellent”.

The big lenses also provide a great environment for as much light to collect in the binocular as it can get. With all the right optical components in place – great glass, quality coatings, realistic objective lens sizes, and usable exit pupils – you have yourself a perfect recipe to stay out for as long as you dare.

Q. What is the Renegade’s weatherproof qualities?

A. Since you know this is a porro prism device, your brain automatically says that it’s not weatherproof at all, right? Well once again, Redfield outdoes themselves. This porro prism Redfield binocular is 100 percent fully waterproof and nitrogen filled to ensure it’s fog-proof.

Let me say this loud and clear – this isn’t the norm for a porro prism binocular. They’re extremely difficult to weatherproof because of their prism design, so for this bino to have waterproof and fog-proof qualities, it’s impressive.

I wouldn’t go testing its limitations by tossing it in the lake or anything like that. But, at least you know you’ll be covered if those storm clouds come rolling in and you’re not quite done with the hunt.

Q. Why doesn’t Redfield list the product dimensions for the Renegade binocular?

A. Redfield isn’t the only optics manufacturer to omit dimension details on their website. The fact of the matter is, the length is really the only size you need to know. This will tell you how long it is and if it will fit your hunting needs. A travel case and lanyard will keep bigger optics nearby.

But…. there is a but. How wide and how thick (height) the binoculars are is also a helpful measurement to know, especially if you’re after a compact bino. Leupold & Stevens disagrees. They say the width isn’t important to list because everyone’s IPD is different and it’s going to be variable which directly affects the width.

But, for those of us who want to see if it will fit inside our camo hunting pockets or in the front slot of our big game vest, knowing those specs will help in the buying process.

If you’re really concerned about the product dimensions, give Leupold & Stevens a call – they might even be more willing to give you these specs than they were for me.

Otherwise, the dimensions listed on Amazon should at least serve as a general idea. Amazon might also just be the one entity to thank for their scrutinizing process of the products they sell.

Redfield Renegade 10X50 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 50 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 17.3 feet
  • Dimensions: 8 x 8 x 3 inches
  • Weight: 31.3 ounces
  • Field of View: 347 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 18 mm/5 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Porro
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups for a fast and custom fit
  • Tripod adaptable for long range viewing and steady handling
  • BAK4 prism glass for superior and brilliant image quality
  • Excellent specs for low light hunting
  • Fully multi-coated lenses for ultimate light transmission potential and pristine images
  • Also available in 10X36 model
  • Fully 100% waterproof and fog-proof for ultimate weatherproof-ability
  • Durable fully armored aluminum body for a robust build and secure gripping
  • Comes with a neoprene neck strap, lens covers, and soft case
  • Backed by Redfield’s Limited Lifetime Guarantee

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Redfield Battlefield 10X42 Review

redfield-battlefield-10x42This Redfield Battlefield 10X42 binocular has 10X power with the ideal sized 42 mm objective lens that are fully multi-coated and made with BAK4 prisms all wrapped up in a fully waterproof and fog-proof device.

Its aluminum and ergonomic roof prism body are fashioned with an eye-catching camo design that is befitting of the tactical reticle the Battlefield sports.

As far as ratings go, it’s still relatively new to the market. There’s yet more to say about this rangefinding… slash… binocular hybrid. So, only time will tell how… or if these rangefinding binos sell.

As the most expensive binocular and the only one of its kind in the Redfield’s binocular line up, there was no way I could omit this rangefinding optic.

Even if you think this marriage of the two optical systems might be a little controversial, just hear me out and then decide for yourself before you buy Redfield rangefinding binoculars.

If you’re curious about what this tactical binocular can offer in a hunting scenario, open your mind and get right into the Q&A.

Battlefield 10X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. Is this a rangefinding binocular?

A. Yes. The included MOA reticle in the left eyepiece of the binocular is what turns this simple bino into a rangefinding machine. Unlike a laser rangefinder that actually displays a distance, this binocular doesn’t.

So, how do you use the reticle?

I know this is going to sound like a textbook answer, but it might just be the best advice you’ll ever get – read the manual. You’ll be given lots of advice to use it this way or that way, but in the end, Redfield is the only one that can tell you how to use it the right way. But, here’s my two cents anyway…

Q. What does the TAC-MOA reticle look like?

A. The Battlefield binocular features the same minute of angle (MOA) reticle that’s used in Redfield’s Battlezone rifle scopes – the TAC-MOA reticle.

The stadia lines extend along the vertical and horizontal cross hairs in 2 MOA increments until they’ve reached the first end of the post. The first part of the post is thin until it converts to a thick post as it reaches the edges of the field of view.

Q. How do I use the TAC-MOA reticle?

A. This is the part that gets a little tricky. It’s not a rifle scope, so you don’t need the preciseness that a rifle scope offers. But, it’s also not a laser rangefinder in the fact that you’re given an instant distance.

And, how to use the Redfield Battlefield rangefinding binocular reticle might get a little confusing since mariners and the military seem to find more use out of it than hunters do.

The idea is to use the 2 MOA stadia lines to give you an approximate value of how far away your target is and its size. The reticle can be aligned by using the knurled left eyepiece to get it aligned with the horizon.

This can be done from any viewing angle you’re on and even despite the variable IPD distance.

This rangefinding and binocular combo can help you in traditional hunting where you’re needing the distance to that trophy without switching from one device to another in a matter of a few critical seconds.

It goes without saying, getting a ton of practice before using it in the field to aid in taking down your target is strongly encouraged.

Q. Will this Battlefield TAC-MOA be good for hunting?

A. Although these types of binoculars are typically made for tactical or even marine use, I don’t see why they wouldn’t be a good tool for hunting.

It has the ideal 10X42 binocular platform, a wide field of view of 341 yards, a close focus distance of 4.3 feet, and an exit pupil of 4.2 mm with an eye relief of 16.3 mm. With these kinds of specs, it would perform perfectly well for hunting as any other hunting binocular does.

But, if you think you’d benefit from a rifle scope or a laser rangefinder, this might be a good point to take a look at our detailed reviews on those hunting optics – including what Redfield has to offer in those departments.

Q. What kind of finish does this binocular have?

A. Unlike the popular black finish that most manufacturers offer, this Battlefield has the camo finish that’s just too cool to pass up. Tac geeks and hunters alike will appreciate the stylish finish.

And to top it off for tactical junkies, it also comes with a MOLLE (moh-lee) case that’ll have you looking like you just stepped out of a Call of Duty X Box game.

If you’re an old school hunter, this comparison may have just offended you. If you’re a youngin’, you’re probably flattered and red from head to toe with excitement.

Q. How much does this Redfield cost?

A. This Battlefield bino is the most expensive binocular of their line. It costs roughly $200. While it’s still in the low budget range, it’s definitely on the higher end of the spectrum.

But, if you’re all over that TAC-MOA reticle, then it would be well worth it, especially since most rangefinding binos are much more expensive.

If you’re not really into using the reticle, you shouldn’t justify spending the extra bucks. You’re better off going with its identical twin, minus the reticle, the already-featured Rebel 10X42. They are literally the exact same optic.

If you really want to nit pick, the only variation is the .2 mm difference in the exit pupil. The Battlefield has .2 mm more of exit pupil than the Rebel – woo, big deal.

They’re also covered by different warranties. The Rebel has the Limited Lifetime Guarantee while the Battlefield has the No Excuses Warranty. That might be something for you to think about.

 Redfield Battlefield 10X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 4.3 feet
  • Dimensions: 7 x 6 x 3 inches
  • Weight: 26.4 ounces
  • Field of View: 341 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 16.3 mm/4.2 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: Yes

Noteworthy Features:

  • TAC-MOA reticle with 2 MOA increments for fast and accurate rangefinding capacity
  • Twist up eye cups for a fast and custom fit
  • Tripod adaptable for long range viewing and steady handling
  • BAK4 prism glass for superior and brilliant image quality
  • Fully multi-coated lenses for ultimate light transmission potential and pristine images
  • Fully 100% waterproof and fog-proof for ultimate weatherproof-ability
  • Durable fully armored aluminum body for a robust build and secure gripping
  • Comes with a neoprene neck strap, lens covers, and MOLLE case
  • Backed by Redfield’s No Excuses Warranty

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Which are the Best Redfield Binoculars For You?

If you’re looking to buy a Redfield binocular and you lasted through this entire review, then it should be clear to you about now which set of binos will best suit your needs.

But, I like to hold hands with those who need a little guidance, so I’ll take you through this step of telling you which binocular you should spend your money on and which one will serve you best out in the field.

My top recommendation in this review is the all-round, ideal, Rebel 10X42. It has everything you’ll need out of a binocular. For the hunter who lures in his prey for a close-range shot to the stalker who peeps from afar, this is the bino with great value and great performance.

The rookies, the middle guys, and the veteran hunters have all agreed – this is the binocular that’ll get it done this hunting season.

The Renegade 10X50 is another excellent binocular. Those looking for a little more hunting time and a little more low light advantages will fly to these like moths to a lit-up bulb.

Don’t forget that if you’re looking for a traditional design, this one has it. The porro prism, 50 mm lens, fully multi-coated lens, and 5 mm exit pupil will have you seeing the stars like you’ve never seen before. Again, any level of hunter will do just fine with a pair of these.

Although the Battlefield isn’t exactly what you would call a “hunting” binocular, it can be beneficial for your traditional hunting needs. If you’ve already got a laser rangefinder or a killer rifle scope, then you mightn’t need the fancy TAC-MOA reticle inside this bino at all.

Your money could be better spent on a cold one at the end of a hunt. But, if you like the idea of merging the two optics into one, this roughly $200 bino is well-spent here on Redfield versus an inferior brand.

Redfield – Quality Optics at Budget Prices

Redfield doesn’t need a ton of options to appeal to the hunter. Redfield doesn’t need a lot of fancy frills to maintain their reputation. Redfield is the meaning of quality optics at low budget prices, and Leupold can attest to that.

Do yourself a favor and scope out the brand. You might just find what you have been looking for. If you feel like you need to see more options then you can’t go past our review of Simmons binoculars, these are priced at under $100 and we delve into 4 of them.