Nikon Binoculars Review: 5 Best-Selling Binos Revealed

Before you delve into the optics market looking to buy Nikon binoculars, you’re going to need to do a lot of research – that is, if you want to make the most of your dollar.

And unfortunately, simply google searching online for the best pair under $200 isn’t as easy as it should be.

If you’re looking for helpful information on a full rundown on great glass, a great body, and even some versatile zooming power, then you’ve found the right place with this Nikon binoculars review.

We are going to have an in-depth look at Nikons:

Almost 100 Nikon’s to Choose From

There are some brands that just don’t quite have the full spectrum of everything you’re looking for in a binocular. Then, there are others that have a ton of options that can almost out-number the sprinkles in an ice-cream shop. One of those brands is Nikon.

With model numbers, fancy names, and product features on this or that, it might seem like it’ll take an eternity just trying to figure out how you’re going to ever make a well-informed purchase… but, there is good news.

This is one of the best Nikon binocular reviews you’ll find, and I’ll take you through Nikon’s most popular pair of binos from entry level to expert handler so that you can start your research and most importantly, end it with a well-informed purchase.

With almost 100 binoculars to choose from, Nikon certainly has some golden goose eggs that hunters will definitely want to cash in on.

Nikon Binoculars Review

The following Nikon binoculars all have something in common – they’ve all been featured in Amazon’s Top 100 Binocular Seller’s List. Right there alongside with Bushnell, Nikon was a repeated and reoccurring favorite for many hunters looking for a sharp set of eyes.

With long eye relief, multi-setting click stop eye cups, and high-end, quality glass, there’s a binocular for the freshman, the middle guy, the confident hunter, and even the pro.

Featured in order of most popular first, let’s see what Nikon binos have the fan base in a craze.

Nikon Monarch 5 10X42 Review

nikon-monarch-5-10x42This Nikon Monarch 5 10X42 topped the 100 Best Seller’s List on Amazon for the Nikon line, and this bino is very deserving of its spot for its ED glass, Eco-Glass, and Dielectric High-Reflective Multilayer Prism Coatings.

It’s rubber armored body and HighPoint design with its all-weatherproof abilities make it bino worthy of being obsessive about.

Although it’s one of the pricier options available, hunters don’t seem to let the price tag get in the way of their obsession with this bino – and you shouldn’t let it either.

Reviewers have been singing the praises of these binoculars.

The older Monarch 5 is the most popular Nikon binocular, and this came as a surprise to me especially when the Monarch 7 series is quite impressive.

But, there’s nothing like a tried and tested optic that really gets consumers going these days, and this is why it deserves the hot spot on this Nikon Monarch binocular review. But, don’t go anywhere, there might yet be a spot for the Monarch 7 to snag.

So what makes this Nikon bino so popular and why should you spend  approximately $300? – that’s the golden question right? Here’s the Q&A to see if your hundies are best spent here along with everyone else’s.

Nikon Monarch 5 10X42 Q&A:

Q. What kind of glass does the Monarch 5 have?

A. The entire Monarch 5 series binoculars have Nikon’s ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) glass lenses that helps to keep chromatic aberrations to a minimum – this means less color fringing for you. For spending in the mid-range price for a binocular, it’s pleasing to see this quality of glass thrown in.

With the special glass lenses, you’ll have as natural-looking images as possible like that of the naked eye. Contrast will be bright and sharp and resolution will be pure and deep.

Q. What kind of light transmission quality does this Monarch binocular have?

A. Unlike other websites that often market their light transmission capabilities with a percentage, Nikon hasn’t done that with the Monarch 5. This may not be indicative of a bad thing.

You see, to measure light transmission quality, manufacturers will often give you a percentage that only applies to the brightest conditions at the brightest time of day, say at noon, to say they can provide up to 98 percent light transmission.

Instead, Nikon tells you that you can reach maximum light transmission for your atmospheric conditions because of the quality of the coatings on the lens.

These Monarch’s have fully multi-coated Eco-Glass lenses applied to all air-to-glass surfaces. This is for the best chances of allowing as much light as possible to reach the eyepiece while also minimizing light loss, reducing glare, and preventing reflection.

Bottom line: the better the coatings, the better the light transmission you’ll have for a brighter, clearer picture. Don’t get sucked in by marketing tactics.

Q. What is Dielectric High-Reflective Multi-layer Prism Coating?

A. This particular bino has the roof prism system that requires special coatings in order to be a high-performing optic.

The dielectric high-reflective multi-layer prism coating gets applied to all the lenses and prism surfaces (where light reflects and bounces off to another surface) to ensure that light loss is kept to a minimum. Why?

Each time light touches and leaves a surface, you lose just a little bit more of light. These coatings help to keep the integrity of the light passing through – this all adds to color richness, color depth, and color fidelity.

Q. What is the eye relief on the Monarch 5 10×42?

A. This has what I would call the perfect amount of eye relief. It has 18.4 mm of wiggle room to offer the user. For people who wear glasses, this is going to be some great news. You’re not going to have to remove your specs or fool around with the eye cups too much to get the perfect field of view.

Q. Are there other magnification models in this Monarch 5 series?

A. There is also the 8X42 and the 12X42 to add in this particular series. While the 12X42 seems impressive, the 8X42 was also specifically mentioned in Amazon’s 100 Top Best Seller’s List. That one model has loads of reviews and a fantastic rating to match.

Needless to say, but I’m going to say it anyway, the Monarch 5 binos are in high demand – it doesn’t seem to matter what power ranges you want.

From what we’ve learned about the Monarch 5, its strengths are all in its image quality. The optical systems in place to provide exceptional brightness and excellent clarity makes this bino a superior optic in the field.

Monarch 5 10X42 Binocular Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 7.8 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.7 x 5.1 inches
  • Weight: 21.6 ounces
  • Field of View: 288 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 18.4 mm/ 4.2 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BaK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Turn & Slide
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Turn and slide rubber eye cups are easy to find that custom fit for a full field of view
  • BaK-4 prisms for optimal glass quality
  • Specially integrated Roof Prism System for optical superiority
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • ED glass for to control color fringing for the best image quality possible
  • Dielectric High-Reflective Multi-layer Prism Coating and Eco-Glass coatings for excellent light transmission and picture quality
  • Lighter than most standard sized binoculars
  • Nikon’s HighPoint design for ultimate brow and eye cup comfort
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and repeated and heavy use
  • Backed by Bushnell’s No Questions Asked Lifetime Warranty Promise

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Nikon Aculon A211 8X42 Review

nikon-aculon-a211-8x42The Nikon Aculon A211 8X42 is the second most popular Nikon binocular to make the list, thanks to its aspherical fully multi-coated lenses with BaK-4 prism glass, Eco-Glass, and very wide field of view. It’s also the cheapest binocular of the review.

Its popularity is easily justified because of its low budget price tag or maybe just because it’s an ideal, all-purpose little bino that gets the job done without fancy frills and twills.

Either way, loads of reviewers online think the Aculon is a killer little optic and gave it a double thumbs up.

With such a huge reviewer fan base, I was obligated to feature the underrated Aculon. While most people pass over the Aculon as a mediocre device, it seems to perform extremely well for those who give it a chance. Obviously, hundreds of people would say I’m right. Will you?

If you like to root for the underdog, and you’re after the low budget price for all the features that you need, then this Q&A is for you. Pore over every question to see if saving yourself a few hundred bucks will get you the extra bucks you need in the bed of your truck.

Nikon Aculon A211 8X42 Q&A:

Q. Does this Nikon binocular have the roof prism or the porro prism design?

A. This Aculon 8X42 has the porro prism design. What gives it away? Take a look at its more traditional binocular design. The eyepieces and objective lenses are unaligned – the eyepieces are closer together while the objectives are further apart.

While roof prisms seem to be getting a lot of attention these days, the porro prism has been the standard prism system for a long time – and for good reason. While it’s not going to be waterproof, you will have some optical advantages.

Porro prisms actually have less reflections to make in its light path on the way to the eyepiece, so optical quality in a porro prism can actually be superior to roof prisms. Also, the porro prisms tend to offer a much deeper image, giving off more of a 3D effect.

For a full run down on the different prism systems, check out our Porro Prisms Vs Roof Prisms article.

Q. What is the glass quality of this low budget binocular?

A. Glass quality is important to consider, especially in low budget binos. You want to have as pure glass as you can get without components that cause imperfections or manufacturing finishing processes that cause blemishes. All of this will have a direct effect on clarity, brightness, and optimal image quality.

Nikon’s Aculon A211 line all use the Eco-Glass lenses that are also environmentally friendly. What do I mean by that? The glass is lead and arsenic-free.

The eyepiece lenses are also aspherical. This means that the lens have aspheric elements to it that can provide a more flat field of view, can minimize spherical aberrations, and can also correct for astigmatism better than other types of basic lenses. This is pretty impressive for a bino that costs less than $80 online.

Q. Is there a variable zoom Aculon?

A. The Nikon Aculon A211 10-22X50 is another hit with Nikon fans. The $150 binocular has the zooming power of 10-22X on large 50 mm objective lenses.

The finger-tip magnification control is smooth and easy to use, making it an affordable and ideal device to use for various hunting conditions and terrains.

Q. What is its close focus distance?

A. If you read any Aculon binocular review online, you’ll find that the close focus distance isn’t anything to brag about – it’s 16.4 feet. While most all-purpose binos are somewhere between 20-25 feet, they do perform a little better than that.

But, if you’re hunting and you’re typically about 50 to 150 yards away from your kill, the 16 feet close focus distance is a non-issue.

Q. Is it waterproof and fog-proof?

A. The unfortunate thing about the Aculon is it isn’t as weatherproof as most of you would like. This is due to the porro prism design. Because of its unique construction, it’s extremely difficult to weatherproof them, so any porro prism bino is unlikely to be fully waterproof or fog-proof.

But, don’t be discouraged by this mere fact. Most people who are using the Aculon in over 90 degree Fahrenheit weather, by the lake during the night, have taken it inside into air conditioned rooms, from inside warm 60 degree plus homes to 30 degree weather outside, haven’t had any issues with fogging or condensation on the inside lenses.

But in the end, for roughly $76, you might just be willing to pay a little more for a weatherproof unit. If you’re wanting the low price for a weatherproof unit, you might want to consider the popular and more compact Nikon Trailblazer 10X25 for only $10 or so more.

While you’re compromising on direct relationship between objective lens size and field of view, exit pupil, and eye relief, you do gain the closer focus distance, weatherproof-ability, really small dimensions and light weight.

Side note: this model too was featured in the Top 100 Best Seller’s List.

Aculon A211 8X42 Binocular Specs:

  • Magnification: 8X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 16.4 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.7 x 7.3 inches
  • Weight: 26.8 ounces
  • Field of View: 420 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 12 mm/ 5.3 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BaK-4
  • Prism System: Porro
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: No/No
  • Eye cups: Turn & Slide
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Turn and slide rubber eye cups are easy to find that custom fit for a full field of view
  • Aspherical fully multi-coated lenses with BaK-4 prism glass
  • Wide 420 feet flat and bright field of view
  • Arsenic-free and lead-free Eco-Glass technology
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and repeated and heavy use

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Nikon Monarch 7 8X42 ATB Review

nikon-monarch-7-8x42-atbThe Nikon Monarch 7 8X42 is pimped out with everything you can think of, ranging from Multi-Setting Click Stop rubber eye cups, ED Glass, and Eco-Glass to Dielectric High-Reflective Multi layer Prism Coatings, ATB, and a really wide field of view.

It will comes as no surprise then that this Monarch reveals itself in one of the best Nikon Monarch binocular reviews as the priciest binocular of the lot at roughly $450.

This is definitely on the more expensive, top-of-the-line, premium end binos for the Nikon company. Impressively, buyers don’t seem to pay attention to the hefty price tag at all.

Because I promised you a full and comprehensive product review to cater to the needs of the various skill levels of all you hunters out there, the Monarch 7 won a spot.

With such a high customer satisfaction rating, aren’t you a little curious to see what this Monarch is decked out with? The flagship line of Nikon’s optics is dressed to impress. Here’s the Q&A to see for yourself.

Monarch 7 8X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What does ATB mean?

A. Good question! To fully appreciate a binoculars worth and to maximize its potential, you’ve gotta know the terminology first. ATB stands for “All Terrain Binocular” because it’s the all-weather, high-performing, most durable bino of the lot.

You’re going to see this designation on quite a few of Nikon’s celebrated binoculars.

If you’re heading out to some rugged and harsh terrain, you’re going to want an ATB bino. It’s not only waterproof and fog-proof, it’s also shockproof thanks to the rubber armored body for incredible dynamic handling.

For you clumsy hunters out there or those who understand that mishaps happen, this is a bonus.

Q. How is this Monarch 7 different to the Monarch 5 mentioned above?

A. There are a lot of similarities between this premium model and the favorite Monarch 5. You’ll see that they both feature the ED glass, Dielectric Multi-layer Prism Coatings, and even the Phase-correction-coated prisms that’s not directly marketed this way on the Monarch 5.

So, if the premium features are the same, what is it that the Monarch 7 has over the 5 series?

The first is the already discussed ATB qualities, and the second is the multi-setting click stop eye cups. While that may sound really fancy, it’s basically Nikon’s turn and slide design but with click stops along the way so that you can find that perfect amount of eye relief.

You don’t have to be a spectacle wearer to appreciate this feature, you might be wearing sun glasses while you’re out hunting in the field. With an eye relief of 17.1, it puts it just over one inch less than the Monarch 5.

But, the Monarch 7 has an excellent wide field of view and has a slightly larger exit pupil too. But in the Monarch 5, you can have an equally impressive optic for $150 less. It’s up to you if the differences are worth it.

Q. Is this a hunting binocular?

A. Yes! All the features and the ATB qualities of this Monarch 7 make it an ideal hunting binocular to have out there in the field with you. While some of you might think you may want to upgrade to the 10X42, that’s not a bad idea – it’s even cheaper than this 8X42 online by roughly $100!

It too was featured in the Top 100 Seller’s List with a great rating from a solid reviewer base.

But, if you’re thinking of turning in the 8X for the 10X based on the slightly more magnification alone, don’t do it. In hunting, the larger field of view, larger exit pupil, and the lighter weight of the 8X42 model are more important than the extra 2X power.

Nikon Monarch 7 8X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 8X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 8.2 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.6 x 5.1 inches
  • Weight: 22.9 ounces
  • Field of View: 420 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 17.1 mm/ 5.3 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BaK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Turn & Slide/Multi-Setting Click Stop
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Multi-Setting Click Stop rubber eye cups for a comfortable and easy to set custom fit
  • ED glass for to control color fringing for the best image quality possible
  • Dielectric High-Reflective Multi-layer Prism Coating and Eco-Glass coatings for excellent light transmission and picture quality
  • Lighter than most standard sized binoculars
  • Wide 420 feet field of view
  • Arsenic-free and lead-free Eco-Glass technology
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and repeated and heavy use
  • ATB strength for use in even the most harshest conditions and rugged terrains
  • Backed by Nikon’s 25 Year Limited Warranty and No-Fault Repair/Replacement Policy

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Nikon Action Extreme 10X50 ATB Review

nikon-action-extreme-10x50-atbThis Nikon Action Extreme 10X50 ATB binocular is a beast of an optic that’ll perform excellently in low light conditions with its 50 mm lens and exit pupil of 5 mm. For a porro prism binocular it’s completely waterproof and fog-proof with its lead and arsenic-free Eco-Glass and click stop rubber eye cups.

Reviewers think it’s worth every penny of its $150 (approx.) price tag.

Nikon has so many binoculars to choose from and this Action Extreme made it into the review because of its placement in the Top 100 Seller’s binoculars list. For all the features it has for a low budget price, it’s obvious why this bino is listed among the favorites.

To see if this is going to be your new low light favorite bino too, see the following Q&A for a full run down.

Action Extreme 10X50 ATB Binocular Q&A:

Q. How will the Nikon Action Extreme perform in low light conditions?

A. The first thing you’ll recognize when you see the Nikon Action Extreme 10X50 should be the large 50 mm lens. With owl eyes this big, you’re going to have a significant amount of light transmission potential when combined with the BaK4 high index prisms and Eco-Glass components.

The other thing to remember about high-performing low light optics is the exit pupil. This Action Extreme has 5 mm of exit pupil which is a practical amount for night time use.

Combine the great, multi-coated glass with large lenses with a pragmatic amount of exit pupil and you’ll be staying out in the field longer than you ought to. Multi coated optics are the way to go and the best Zeiss binoculars all have them.

Q. How practical is the Action Extreme for hunting?

A. This Nikon binocular has a couple advantages that make it a great hunting optic. First, is the excellent low light capabilities as mentioned just above.

Second, is the ATB feature that gives it its waterproof, fog-proof, and shockproof abilities. This is extremely impressive to see on a porro prism bino – yes, a porro prism bino!

Unfortunately, when I mentioned that this bino is a beast, I wasn’t kidding. It weighs in at 36 ounces and is 7 inches in length and 7.7 inches wide. For extended use, this is going to give you some serious wrist fatigue.

But, there is a solution – it’s tripod adaptable. Just under the hinge plate is the bushing for an L shaped/right angle adapter to be screwed into place to attach the tripod. If you’re sitting in one position, the tripod is the ideal fix.

If you’re more of a walk and stalk kinda hunter, then you might have to do some wrist strengthening exercises.

Q. Does this Nikon come with any accessories?

A. If you’re wondering what’s in the box when it arrives, you’ll be happy to know that there are some extra bonus accessories thrown in. Your binocular will be well taken care of with the included travel case, lens covers, and adjustable binocular strap.

Q. Does this binocular require batteries to operate?

A. There seems to be a lot of confusion as to whether or not the Action Extreme 10X50 requires batteries to use. Let me say this once – no. No battery is required and no battery can be used. There’s no illumination or laser rangefinding feature that requires any power source.

The confusion seems to stem from an incorrect product description on Amazon stating that it requires one Lithium ion battery. I can’t explain it other than it being one really long and wordy typo.

Q. Does this binocular come with a Nikon warranty?

A. It does! All of Nikon’s ATB binoculars are covered by Nikon’s Nikon’s 25 Year Limited Warranty and No-Fault Repair/Replacement Policy.

What does this mean for you?

If something is wrong or happens with your optic, you can send it in for repair or replacement. If the repairs or replacement aren’t qualifiable per the 25 Year Limited Warranty, Nikon will still have your back. The repairs or replacement optic will then fall under the No-Fault Repair/Replacement Policy.

The catch-22 with this part of the warranty is you have to pay $10 and the shipping/handling costs associated with sending it in. On top of that, even if the damage is caused by you and is clearly your fault why it’s acting up in the first place, it’s definitely worth the few bucks to get it working like brand new again.

Nikon Action Extreme 10X50 ATB Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 50 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 23 feet
  • Dimensions: 7 x 7.7 inches
  • Weight: 36 ounces
  • Field of View: 341 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 17.2 mm/ 5 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BaK-4
  • Prism System: Porro
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Turn & Slide/Click Stop
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Large 50 mm objective lenses for maximum low light hunting potential
  • BaK-4 prisms for optimal glass quality
  • Click Stop rubber eye cups for a variable, comfortable, and easy to set custom fit
  • Arsenic-free and lead-free Eco-Glass technology
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and repeated and heavy use
  • ATB strength for use in even the most harshest conditions and rugged terrains
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • Backed by Nikon’s 25 Year Limited Warranty and No-Fault Repair/Replacement Policy

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Nikon Prostaff 3S 8X42 Review

nikon-prostaff-3s-8x42This Prostaff 3S 8X42 has a low budget price at roughly $120 with high-reflectivity silver-alloy mirror coatings and multi-coated Eco-Glass lenses. It has an amazing, extended eye relief of 20.2 mm, a proficient 5.3 mm exit pupil, wide field of view, and is incredibly light weight for its build class, weighing only 19.9 ounces!

So far online, there’s barely any buzz about it since it just hit the market in 2016. But, what little has been said about it is unbeatable this far. It has gotten off to a strong start with a top rating that mightn’t be too hard for the Prostaff 3S to hold in the coming months ahead.

Being so new to the market, it’s impressive to see this binocular any where near the Top 100 Seller’s binocular list, so it snagged a spot in this review. With its “new car” smell and low budget price tag, I wouldn’t be surprised to see it gain a few spots ahead in the Top 100 list.

To see if this Prostaff 3S is worth the attention its attracting, I’ve provided you with the Q&A for you to decide for yourself.

Prostaff 3S 8X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What is high-reflectivity silver-alloy mirror coatings?

A. Here’s the short answer. All roof prism systems are going to need two types of coatings: phase coatings and mirror coatings. This is the mirror coating that allows light to be reflected throughout the light path in the barrel to ensure light reaches the eyepiece.

What’s so good about this one?

Long answer: A silver mirror coating is typically a step up from the aluminum mirror coating. While the aluminum coatings have a reflectivity of 87 percent to 93 percent, silver coatings have a reflectivity of 95 percent to 98 percent.

Better yet is the dielectric high-reflective multi-layer prism coatings that are seen on the Monarch series binoculars mentioned in this Nikon binocular review.

Bottom line: Combine this highly reflective mirror coating with multi-coated lenses and 5.3 mm of exit pupil and you have the potential for some bright, sharp, and pure picture quality.

Q. Is this a compact binocular?

A. You betcha! This Prostaff is not only smaller in dimensions, 6 x 5.1 x 2.0 inches, it’s also light weight for a binocular in its class. It weighs a light 19.9 ounces whereas similar models are about 23 to 26 ounces.

A binocular in the 20-ounce range is still generally considered light weight. But, being able to keep glass quality, an all-round and ideal magnification, and classic-sized objective lenses for under 20 ounces indicates it will be a compact and great hand-held unit.

Q. How much does the Prostaff 3S 8X42 cost?

A. For an all-purpose binocular, it’s arguably in the right price range for its quality – approx $120. While there’s nothing really fancy about it to kick its price tag into the additional zero digit fields, there’s enough about it that makes it an ideal optic for hunters. The low budget cost is like the honey pot for the bear – irresistible.

Q. Does the Nikon Prostaff 3S have long eye relief?

A. If you thought that eye relief only applied to rifle scopes, then you’re probably a rookie new to optics. Don’t feel bad – we were newbies once upon a time too. But, this Prostaff 3S sports a fantastic 20.2 mm of eye relief. Now, this is what I would call extended or long eye relief.

If you’re thinking that maybe this is too far out for you to feel comfortable, the twist up style eye cups have the multi-setting click stop rubber eye cups to adjust for a custom fit.

But, if you’re a spectacle-wearing, sun shade-donning kinda guy, then you’re definitely going to appreciate the long eye relief these pair of binos afford you.

Nikon Prostaff 3S 8X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 8X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 9.8 feet
  • Dimensions: 6 x 5.1 x 2 inches
  • Weight: 19.9 ounces
  • Field of View: 377 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 20.2 mm/ 5.3 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BaK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Turn & Slide/Click Stop
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • BaK-4 prisms for optimal glass quality
  • Multi-Setting Click Stop rubber eye cups for a variable, comfortable, and easy to set custom fit
  • Arsenic-free and lead-free Eco-Glass technology
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and repeated and heavy use
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • Backed by Nikon’s 25 Year Limited Warranty and No-Fault Repair/Replacement Policy

Rating:

Check Lowest Price on Amazon

Which are the Best Nikon Binoculars For You?

For those of you on a tight budget and you’re looking for something under a hundred bucks, the Aculon A211 8X42 is for you. It will pleasantly surprise you with its high-performing abilities for a low budget bino.

Still in the lower end of the budget but less than $200 is the Nikon Action Extreme 10X50 ATB and the Nikon Prostaff 3S 8X42. If you want more low light qualities, the Action Extreme is the optic you want – just remember the hefty weight. For a more compact and light weight device with excellent eye relief, the Prostaff 3S is the way to go.

In the mid-range category of popular Nikon binos, you’ve got the famous Nikon Monarch 5 10X42. This by far was the most beloved bino of the lot. In the 100 Top Best Binocular Seller’s List on Amazon, this is the bino that is the leading device for the Nikon brand.

And last of all, the most expensive bino of the review, the Nikon Monarch 7 8X42 ATB. Even though it costs around $500, it deserved its spot in this Nikon review. If you’re willing to dish out the hefty cost for this extremely rugged bino, you won’t have any buyer’s remorse.

Nikon – Simply Undebatable

Nikon is synonymous with trust, quality, and low prices – this is an undebatable fact that hundreds of Nikon users have proved. When Nikon’s mission is to not only meet the demands of the hunter, but to exceed their expectations as well, you can be sure that you’re going to have a lifetime purchase out of a Nikon buy.