Celestron Binoculars Review: 5 Binos Under $250!

If you want the best of what low budget has to offer, then you want a Celestron binocular for your next hunt. The best part about it is, you shouldn’t have to spend more than $250 for any of the models in this Celestron binoculars review.

Sticking under the $250 price mark we are going to check out the:

If you’re looking for a binocular that will get you into the spirit of your hunt, then Celestron has it. We’ll get into the specs of a very affordable bino to one of the most technologically jam-packed electronic binoculars Celestron has to offer.

Who are Celestron?

Celestron has roots all the way back to the late 1950s, and from its humble beginnings, it’s now a world-class optics brand that has a team of expert product developers and big-league engineers behind its back.

Celestron is one of the leading-industry binocular manufacturers in the low budget price range. The quality they provide for the affordable price tag is truly unmatched. With a warranty on all of their products, you really have nothing to lose and everything to gain. When you spend any amount of money on Celestron, rest assured it’s money well spent.

Celestron Binoculars Review

For a full rundown of fully multi-coated lenses, BAK-4 prism glass, and full weatherproof-ability to ED glass and maybe a GPS feature as well, it’s all covered in one of the best Celestron binocular reviews online.

Celestron Outland X 10X42 Review

outland-x-10x42This Celestron Outland X 10X42 has twist up eyecups, multi-coated lenses, and is fully waterproof and fog-proof to survive all types of harsh weather.

Online, it has one of the largest followings for the Celestron brand with over hundreds of buyers submitting their votes. And, this Outland X has done extraordinarily well with an extremely good rating with a lot of well-pleased users.

As you can probably guess, its large following of fans and low price under $100 is what has this special binocular featured first in the Celestron lineup – there was no debate about it.

So, let’s take a look at the Q&A to see if we can see the same image quality that hundreds of other people can see through this Outland X.

Outland X 10X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. Is this Outland a full size binocular?

A. This Celestron is more of a mid-size binocular versus a full-size one, but it has every capability that a full-size bino offers. In fact, with its multi-coated optics, fully waterproof and fog-proof abilities, and overall quality build, it’s actually more capable of excellent performance than some other brands’ full size binos.

This Outland weighs only 21.8 ounces, and its physical dimensions are 5.75 x 4.96 x 2.08 inches. It’s the perfect combo for a hunter who wants something that won’t be a burden to take around and stow away with ease.

Q. Who is this Outland 10X42 for?

A. The techs and specs of this 10X42 is actually perfect for hunters, hikers, nature observers, and bird watchers. In fact, sport spectators could get a lot of use out of them too.

These binos are what you would call entry level binoculars, and they’ve got the entry level price tag of around $60 to match. With a little bit of focusing and adjusting to do at first, even the newbie hunter could get used to these. The affordable price of this entry level optic makes it the perfect starter binocular for hunting.

Q. What is the image quality like?

A. This Outland has BAK4 prism glass with multi-coated lenses. The BAK4 is a great start to knowing you’re going to have good image quality. The second thing is the multi-coated optics. Although, it’s unusual to have fully multi-coated optics in this price range, it still would be nice. Why?

The multi-coated lenses means that only one air-to-glass surface has had multiple coatings. Take a look through the Outland during extremely bright conditions and you might sporadically seeing a red halo-like effect going on.

This could be eliminated if it had fully multi-coated optics, but again, for being around $60, it doesn’t seem like it will interfere with your hunting… too much.

Q. What is the body quality on this Outland X?

A. The entire binocular is fully covered in a protective rubber armor that’s durable and attractive at the same time. This will be just fine if it accidentally endures a fall or takes a ding here and there.

The only negative thing I’ll comment on is the lack of additional texture or grooves to help maintain that steady grip. If you’re out in 90 degree weather and your hands are sweating from glassing for hours, it might be a little difficult to hold in place with no added texture or stippling for secure gripping, even with gloves on.

Q. What is the eye relief?

A. The eye relief is a short 14 mm. For glasses wearers who wear their specs further down the nose, this might be a problem. If you can’t get the right amount of eye relief, even with the twist up cups barely pulled out to a position that might work, you’re going to lose some field of view, and on this 294 feet field of view bino, you could probably use all you can get.

I’d say skip this one and go with the Outland X 8X42 that has a wide field of view of 357 feet with an eye relief of 18 mm. It’s also cheaper – perfect!

Celestron Outland X 10X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 14.8 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.75 x 4.96 x 2.08 inches
  • Weight: 21.8 ounces
  • Field of View: 294 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 14 mm/ 4.2 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eyecups for a comfortable and true fit
  • BAK4 prisms for optimal glass and bright, sharp image quality
  • Roof Prism System for more rugged, lighter weight, and durable body
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and binocular protection
  • Backed by Celestron’s Limited Lifetime Warranty

Rating:

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Celestron LandScout 10X50 Review

landscout-10x50This Celestron LandScout 10X50 binocular has BAK4 prisms, fully-multi-coated optics, and large 50 mm lens. It’s also made out of aluminum housing, is fully waterproof and fog-proof, and has the traditional porro prism design.

It has an excellent rating online with an extremely impressive customer satisfaction rating.

On top of its prime rating, it also won the annual Best Binoculars Award for 2015 on an accomplished optics forum. Like them, I also found the quality features of the LandScout intriguing, and for under $100, it’s got a spot on this review.

If you’re curious what has everyone buzzing about this first-class bino that’s in entry level price range, let’s take a peek at the Q&A.

LandScout 10X50 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What is the advantage of this porro prism over a roof prism?

A. The most obvious factor you’ll notice when you feast your eyes on a LandScout is the traditional binocular design – the porro prism. While the roof prism is a more aesthetically-pleasing, if you will, and streamlined design, the porro does have some optical advantages over a roof prism in this price range.

Porro prisms don’t require as many reflections as roof prisms do, and they also don’t need the specially formulated coatings that roof prisms require in order to function. This keeps the costs down and the porro prisms at an optical advantage since roof prisms will often be made without the coatings just to cater to the low budget market.

On top of all this, the LandScout also has the BAK4 prism glass in a porro prism bino. There are no limitations to what this porro prism can do versus a roof prism of the same price, in fact, it’s going to be far superior to a roof prism that’s made in the same price.

Q. Is this a heavy binocular?

A. The downside to traditional porro prisms are the fact that they are more on the heavy side versus roof prisms and even reverse porro prism binoculars. But, the upside to the porro prism design is the way you can hold and manage the weight. This LandScout is a heavy 33.3 ounces, but it’s got ergonomics on its side.

While Celestron knows about the heifer status of the LandScout, they sure did balance the weight out well over the aluminum chassis. While glassing for hours, the normally heavy weight would induce fatigue, but not with this one.

The ergonomic design has you gripping the bino with thumbs wrapped comfortably around the binocular. It’s ergonomic design always allows you to hold an entire barrel comfortably while stalking when it’s not in use.

Q. Is this a low light hunting binocular?

A. Is it ever! The large 50 mm owl eyes staring back at you gave its low light strengths away, didn’t it? So, not only does this LandScout have large 50 mm lenses to collect as much light as possible for when the sun is going down and the moon is coming up, you’ve also got a couple other advantageous elements in your favor.

You have a large 5 mm exit pupil that will probably provide about as much light as your pupils can handle. The bino also has a twilight factor of 22.3 which is great for low light hunting and excellent compared to other low budget binos.

With fully multi-coated lens on BAK4 prism glass to add into the mix, this will enable you to finally attain that “night owl” status that you hadn’t had since you were a teen. No more early nights for you!

Q. What kind of eyecups does the LandScout binocular have?

A. These have your ever-popular twist up eyecups. This is relieving to see instead of the rubber fold up/down eyecups that are seen on many low budget binoculars that can be tricky to truly get that custom fit and comfort level.

They’re rather easy to rotate and move into position. You’ll also appreciate the positive clicks you get when it’s fully extended, retracted, and at the mid-way point.

The only downside I can think of regarding the eyecups is the rigid design that’s supposed to help you grip and twist them easier. Unfortunately, when holding it up against the eyes, it might be a little too hard for your liking. They might indent a little further into the bridge of your nose and the upper bone of your brow.

Celestron LandScout 10X50 Specs:

  • Magnification: 10X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 50 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 22.9 feet
  • Dimensions: 6.69 x 7.75 x 2.44 inches
  • Weight: 33.3 ounces
  • Field of View: 346 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 17.9 mm/ 5 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Porro
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eyecups for a comfortable and true fit
  • Large 50 mm fully multi-coated lens for low light strength
  • BAK4 prisms for optimal glass and bright, sharp image quality
  • Porro prism design with large frame for an ergonomic and comfortable hold
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and binocular protection
  • Backed by Celestron’s Limited Lifetime Warranty

Rating:

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Celestron Cavalry 7X50 GPS Review

cavalry-7x50-gpsThis Celestron Cavalry 7X50 GPS binocular has BAK4 prisms and fully multi-coated optics on a porro prism design. But, the good stuff is the rangefinding reticle and an integrated LCD screen that provides GPS coordinates and compass directions.

With a decent amount of reviewers online, this nifty, little, electronic binocular has a great rating.

This is so out-of-the-box for most traditional hunters, that you mightn’t want to go near it at all. But, this could be the rangefinding, GPS, and rifle scope combo that you’ve always wanted in one convenient device – the super machined-up binocular.

If you’re just as curious as I am to see if this electronic bino is a come-and-go gadget or a solid binocular hunting tool, let’s really get scrutinous in the Q&A.

Cavalry 7X50 GPS Binocular Q&A:

Q. What does the LCD screen display?

A. The 0.79 x 1.02 inch/2 x 2.6 cm LCD screen displays three sets of information, the compass direction, GPS coordinates, and the level reading. It’s user-friendly and has two buttons on it. The right button is the power on/off, and the left button with the “M” on it the mode button to shift between the three features.

Q. How does the Compass work?

A. The LCD screen will display in mils or degrees the compass readings for the direction you’re pointing the binocular in. When looking through the bino, the arrow on the screen will reflect the direction you’re pointing to and the circle around it will shift to align itself with true North – not magnetic North.

Q. How does the GPS and digital level work?

A. There’s nothing complicated or fancy about the GPS feature. The LCD screen will display your altitude level and the latitude and longitude coordinates.

The digital bubble level is exactly that – a built-in level in the bino that tells you whether or not your binocular is being held level to the ground. On this screen, a large black circle will appear with a blue circle in the center.

There will also be a red circle and it will shift and move across the screen until you meet it with the blue circle in the center. Once you have – voila, you’re level.

Q. What is the reticle like on the Cavalry?

A.. If you’re looking to buy Celestron rangefinding binoculars, then this might intrigue you. The reticle on the bino features stadia lines vertically and horizontally along the cross hairs. You can use this to measure the size of your target and to range distances.

Now, on the eye bell of the left barrel is a reticle calculator dial. While this looks really intimidating, you’ll get the hang of it once you get your mitts on it. The calculator has a rotating ring, three sets of number scales, and an angle indicator.

Q. How much does this GPS binocular cost?

A. This fancy electronic bino costs around $200. What’s also interesting is, it’s the most expensive one in the entire Calvary series although there is a 10X50 and a 15X70 model.

Q. How is this as a hunting binocular?

A. If you’re not too interested in the electronic features, you still might want to know that this has large 50 mm lens with a 7.1 mm exit pupil, fully multi-coated lenses on BAK4 prism glass… and you know what this means right?

It’s a low light beast of an optic. It also has extended eye relief of 23 mm and an extremely wide field of view of 394 feet. Optically, this is an excellent hunting binocular, but…

It is on the heavy side, weighing 31.5 ounces. If you plan on glassing for extended periods of time without a tripod since it’s only 7X power, you might be brewing up some serious fatigue. You could also save the money and go with one of Celestron’s equally great hunting binos that don’t have the electronic features with it.

Celestron Cavalry 7X50 GPS Specs:

  • Magnification: 7X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 50 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 32.7 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.8 x 7.8 x 3.2 inches
  • Weight: 31.5 ounces
  • Field of View: 394 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 23 mm/ 7.1 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Porro
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: Yes

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eyecups for a comfortable and true fit
  • Large 50 mm fully multi-coated lens for low light strength
  • BAK4 prisms for optimal glass and bright, sharp image quality
  • Porro prism design with large frame for an ergonomic and comfortable hold
  • Extremely wide field of view of 394 feet at 1000 yards
  • LCD screen displays digital GPS, level, and compass values
  • Includes rangefinding reticle and calculator dial for no math formulas or guess work
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and binocular protection
  • Backed by Celestron’s Limited Lifetime Warranty

Rating:

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Celestron TrailSeeker 8X42 Review

trailseeker-8x42This Celestron TrailSeeker 8X42 binocular seems to have it all with their dielectric and phase coated BAK4 prisms with fully broadband multi-coated optics and an extremely huge 426 feet field of view.

You’ve also got the metal twist up eyecups, an impressive close focus distance of 6.5 feet, and it’s tripod adaptable, all on a magnesium alloy chassis that belies its light weight of 23.1 ounces.

Online, it has a near perfect rating. And, this isn’t with mere numbers either, there are plenty of reviews about this excellent feature-packed bino and many of them give the big double thumbs up.

That’s impressive for one of the most expensive binos in this review and for this amount of a review base.

As you can tell by the raving introduction, this bino has every right to be here in one of the best Celestron binocular reviews. It’s going to be the best bang for your buck bino you’ll read about here today.

Now, if you’re ready to get into all the full details of the high-end features on this low budget binocular, here’s the Q&A.

TrailSeeker 8X42 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What are dielectric coatings?

A. Roof prism binoculars at their base are inferior to porro prism binos. But, with the right coating technology, they can be the optical prism champions.

There is an angled surface in the prism assembly that’s incapable of reflecting light internally, and so it needs two sets of specially formulated coatings to be have an efficient light reflecting surface.

One set is the mirror coating and this is the dielectric coating. It’s not silver or aluminum like what low budget binoculars typically use, it has dielectric elements to behave like a dielectric mirror – what you would find on very high quality and high end mirrors.

This refractive index rate of dielectric mirror coatings can be over 99 percent of the entire light spectrum. You’re going to have clear, bright, and sharp images.

Q. What are phase corrected coatings?

A. This is the phase correcting material that’s applied to the prisms to help keep light loss from happening and from scattering. When light-waves pass through glass that hasn’t been treated with phase corrected coatings, it will get out of sync or phase out from one another.

This will result in low resolution… you know, the not quite sharp image effect.

When you apply phase correction materials, that’s another story. When light-waves pass through the glass, they maintain their flexibility and ability to remain in phase or in sync with one another as they travel the light path from the objective bell to the eyepiece.

This is what creates sharp picture quality and helps to maintain color fidelity.

Q. Why doesn’t it have ED glass?

A. Usually when you see such high quality coatings involved in the making of binoculars, you’d typically see HD or ED glass elements thrown in the mix. However, this is usually only typical with high-end, premium binoculars.

Although this TrailSeeker has the special coatings, it doesn’t have the Extra-Low Dispersion glass that provides High Definition effects. This doesn’t mean it’s not a quality optic.

It also means that Celestron was able to cut costs and keep them to a minimum to provide you with the lowest price possible for a top-drawer binocular.

With the dielectric and phase corrected coatings on BAK4 prisms, you’re getting a whole lotta quality that’s more than the roughly $200 you’ll pay for this bino.

Q. What are the metal twist up eyecups?

A. Most eyepieces and eyecups, and especially low budget pieces, are commonly made out of plastic with a rubber covering for comfort and ease of use. But, Celestron goes all out and makes these pieces out of metal, also with a rubber covering.

This is important to note because this area of the binocular sees heavy use and is usually where you’ll start seeing wear and tear first. Since it’s made out of metal and not plastic, it’s extremely robust and strong and will outlast heavy and repeated usage for a long time to come.

Q. What is the field of view on this TrailSeeker?

A. This Celestron binocular has an impressive 426 feet field of view at 1000 yards. This is the total amount of area you can view from 1000 yards from edge to edge of your full field of view.

Why is this important? If you’re a birder who needs to see fast moving birds, then the wide field of view is vital. The same goes with if you’re a hunter and you want to glass a wide, open area for any sign of movement from a buck, especially if they’ve spotted you first and they’re on the run.

Celestron TrailSeeker 8X42 Specs:

  • Magnification: 8X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 42 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 6.5 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.5 x 5.1 x 2 inches
  • Weight: 23.1 ounces
  • Field of View: 426 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 17 mm/5.25 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Broadband Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Metal Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Robust metal twist up eyecups with rubber covering for comfortable and true fit
  • Fully Broadband Multi-Coated BAK4 prisms for optimal glass and bright, sharp image quality
  • Extremely wide field of view of 426 feet at 1000 yards
  • Dielectric and phase correction coatings for ultimate resolution and max reflectivity for brighter, crisper, and clearer images
  • Impressive close focus distance of 6.5 feet
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and binocular protection
  • Backed by Celestron’s Limited Lifetime Warranty

Rating:

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Celestron Granite 9X33 Review

granite-9x33This Celestron Granite 9X33 binocular has fully broadband multi-coated BAK4 prisms and ED glass for brilliant and sharp image quality. This Granite bino also goes a step further with metal eyepieces, diopter ring, eyecups, and focus wheel for ultimate and robust construction.

With many reviews online, this Granite super star has an excellent rating with many reviewers giving this Celestron binocular a perfect score. Now that’s a rating worth telling everyone about.

I thought I’d change this review up a little and go with the 9X33 instead of the popular 10X42 binocular. Also, this 9X33 model keeps it at a nice low price of around $250. One upgrade to the 10X42 will kick the price up quite a bit.

Now, to finally see ED on a Celestron binocular, let’s get right into answering your questions about it and any others you might have in our detailed Q&A.

Granite 9X33 Binocular Q&A:

Q. What is ED glass?

A. ED stands for Extra-Low Dispersion, and when you see this on a binocular, you know you’re getting into big-boy territory with premium models.

ED glass provides high definition (HD) effects because of the way light behaves when it makes contact with the glass. ED material keeps light from scattering within the prism assembly of the binocular and aims to keep light-waves together in their proper frequencies.

This results in minimized chromatic aberration. Chroma – what? Color fringing. You’ll know this as the fuzzy or blurry colored halo effect around the edges of your target.

If you look at a target through ED glasses that has a high contrast against the background, you should be able to see the true colors and edges of the target, not any blurry, purple-ish or red and yellow hues. This is what ED does.

Q. Is this binocular tripod adaptable?

A. Yes, this is a tripod adaptable binocular. If you haven’t ever mounted a bino to a tripod before, you could get thrown off by the open bridge design. This is a common mistake since you’d naturally want to look to the underside to see if that’s where it would mount.

But, don’t worry, you’re not the first to make this mistake.

If you look at the bino with the objective lens facing you, you’ll see a logoed part that juts out from in between them. By taking this cap off, you now have access to the threading to be able to mount an adapter and then a tripod.

Q. Is this Granite weather-proof?

A. For a roughly $250 binocular with high-end features, need you ask? Of course it’s fully waterproof and nitrogen purged for fog-proofness. This binocular is going to withstand any sort of weather that you endure and brave.

It’s not going to leave your side, become faulty, or leave you hanging.

The other weatherproof feature that also helps is the metal components with the rubber covering to keep internal parts completely sealed off. The diopter, eyepieces, center focusing wheel, and eyecups are all constructed out of metal for absolute durability.

Q. What comes in the box with the Granite 9X33?

A. If you’re looking to buy Celestron binoculars, expect to see a whole lot of accessories at the grand box opening.

You’ll have the owner’s/instruction manual, lens cleaning cloth, and a carrying case. You’ll also be given objective lens caps, rainguard (eyepiece caps), a harness strap, and a neck strap.

The harness strap is an exciting one since it costs $20 if you were to buy one. But, it keeps the binocular close and at the ready for whenever you need that critical and close up vision.

Celestron Granite 9X33 Specs:

  • Magnification: 9X
  • Power Variability: Fixed
  • Objective Diameter: 33 mm
  • Close Focus Distance: 8.2 feet
  • Dimensions: 5.4 x 4.9 x 2.1 inches
  • Weight: 20.1 ounces
  • Field of View: 378 feet/1000 yards
  • Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 14.1 mm/3.6 mm
  • Optics Coatings: Fully Broadband Multi-Coated
  • Glass: BAK-4
  • Prism System: Roof
  • Focus System: Center
  • Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
  • Eye cups: Metal Twist up
  • Tripod adaptable: Yes
  • Rangefinder: No

Noteworthy Features:

  • Robust metal twist up eyecups with rubber covering for comfortable and true fit
  • Metal constructed diopter, eyepiece, and center focus wheel for long-lasting durability
  • Fully Broadband Multi-Coated BAK4 prisms for optimal glass and bright, sharp image quality
  • Extremely wide field of view of 426 feet at 1000 yards
  • Dielectric and phase correction coatings for ultimate resolution and max reflectivity for brighter, crisper, and clearer images
  • Great close focus distance of 8.2 feet
  • Fully weatherproof and fog-proof for all-weather use
  • Rubber armored body for non-slip grip and binocular protection
  • Backed by Celestron’s Limited Lifetime Warranty

Rating:

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Which is the Best Celestron Binocular for You?

All of the binos in the best Celestron binocular review are all around $250 or less. The neat thing about Celestron is they don’t compromise on quality even though they’re giving you a steal. The best example of this is the LandScout bino.

If weight and size isn’t a big deal to you, then the LandScout 10X50 is an excellent binocular to have in your tool belt. For under $100, this could be your starter pair or your lifetime purchase – it’s certainly very capable of that.

But, if you came to Celestron to get even more of a deal, the Outland X 10X42 and the 8X42 are excellent optics for an entry level binocular. If you’re new to hunting or if you just want something easy to use without any fuss, these Outland binos will get it done with style.

For a real techie kind of experience, the Calvary is a no-brainer bino if you want it all. You have the GPS, compass, built-in digital level, and a rangefinding reticle all in one device.

Although it’s very intuitive and easy to use, a hunter with experience using reticles and the like would find a lot more use out of it than your traditional, need-it-straight kinda guy.

Now, the Granite binocular is an exceptional device. It’s got everything you want to see on a premium device. The Trailseeker is also a high-end binocular, just without the ED glass – but don’t hold it against it.

You’re still getting a steal for under $200 with this bino. But, if you want the whole package and the ED glass to boot, the $250(approx) Granite is going to be your pick today.

Buy Celestron and Be Proud

Celestron has a proud reputation that’s known for their state-of-the-art telescope technology. But, that doesn’t mean they don’t know how to do hunters right either.

For an unmatched glassing experience for low budget price and with telescope ingenuity made useful for hunter environments, who would be better than the telescope giant, Celestron, to do it?

The products, the ratings, and the hunters say, “Celestron”.