Bushnell Trophy 10X42 Michael Waddell Bone Collector Binoculars (Model 234210)

bushnell-trophy-xlt-10x42mm-bone-collector-editionMagnification: 10X
Power Variability: Fixed
Objective Diameter: 42 mm
Close Focus Distance: 8.2 feet
Dimensions: 7 x 6 x 3 inches
Weight: 25 ounces
Field of View: 325 feet/1000 yards
Eye Relief/Exit Pupil: 15.2 mm/ 4.2 mm
Optics Coatings: Fully Multi-Coated
Glass: BaK-4
Prism System: Roof
Focus System: Center
Waterproof/Fog-proof: Yes/Yes
Eye cups: Twist up
Tripod adaptable: Yes
Rangefinder: No

Best Uses: Hunting, For the Range, Birdwatching, Wildlife Observation

Our Rating:

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Bushnell Trophy XLT 10X42 Bone Collector Edition Review

Featuring the ideal 10X 42mm magnification and objective lens diameter combination, the Trophy XLT 10X42 Bone Collector Edition binocular is one of Bushnell’s best-selling models.

With Dura-Grip rubber armor, fully multi-coated optics, fast focus and soft-touch thumbgrips, the roof prism binocular is made for viewing wildlife at long distance ranges. Add to that the wide field of view and 100% waterproof and fog-proof design and you have no need to look anywhere else for an ideal hunting binocular – a statement that is backed up by the droves of positive reviews about it online.

In fact, the Michael Waddell Bone Collector Edition binoculars are a great hit with Bushnell users, and not just because of their low cost. So, what does this special edition optic have on offer other than its famous name? And who is Michael Waddell anyway?

Our Q&A has the answers you’re looking for and more!

 

PROs:
  • Price
  • Tripod adaptable
  • Dura-Grip rubber armor
  • Fully weatherproof
  • Michael Waddell Bone Collector Edition
CONs:
  • Focusing issues

 

Bone Collector Edition Binocular Q&A:

What is the Bone Collector Edition?

This Trophy XLT 10X42 binoculars is part of the Michael Waddell Bone Collector Edition. Who the heck is Michael Waddell? Well, he’s probably going to be the craziest Southern hunter that you’ll ever hear of and he knows his stuff about hunting and optics.

Do I need mention for you ignoramuses out there that he’s a TV sensation too?

As far as Bushnell goes, they have this Trophy XLT 10X42 binocular, the 3-9X40 Bone Collector rifle scope, a Bone Collector’s Edition laser rangefinder, and even one bad boy-lookin’ Bone Collector trail camera.

 

What is this Bone Collector useful for?

Even after all the hype calms down, you’re still left with having to scrutinize the binoculars for quality and trust that it’ll do everything you need it to do – Michael Waddell approved or not. Good thing for you, the Bone Collector holds up to its most basic function.

Even above its basic binocular use, it’s been outfitted for the serious hunter who plans to spend some serious time in the hunt. It’s 100% waterproof and 100% fog-proof to endure any weather that fate might have you in when that trophy of a lifetime comes by.

The Dura-Grip rubber will make sure there’s not ever another slip and drop again, even in the wettest conditions.

With this body armoring as its protection, feel free to bump, bang, and stalk in the rain forever more. With 10X magnification and a great size 42 mm objective lens, no deer is going to get past you.

 

What is center focus?

This Bushnell binocular has the center focusing system that is the most common of three different types of focusing systems. It indicates that in the center of the eyepieces is a center focusing wheel.

This wheel is responsible for focusing your eyes with the optical plane in the binoculars to get the sharpest image possible of your target.

On one side of the center focus wheel will be a diopter adjustment. This will typically have a minus sign and a plus sign marking on either sides of a “0” (zero) which may or may not have a marked scale on it to use for future reference.

If you learn how to correctly adjust your set of binos after you take them out of the box, you’ll have a fully calibrated binocular that you can use to its maximum potential.

You’d be surprised to learn that most bino users forget this very important step.

 

What kind of prism system does this Bone Collector have?

Out of the two optical prism systems available, the porro and roof, the roof prism system is often seen on high end binoculars. However, Bushnell doesn’t limit the potential of their low budget binos.

With its roof prism system this Bone Collector has the streamlined look that seems as if light travels in a straight path to the eye piece versus the zig zag shape of the porro prism system.

This is because you can clearly see that the objective lenses are directly aligned with the eyepieces because of the straight barrels. Although it seems like the light path is happening in a straight line, it’s not as elementary as you may think.

It actually involves a much more complicated system to create a path for light to reach the eyepiece – it has to go through six reflections before it reaches you.

Because of this, the roof prism system costs a lot more to make and involves more detailed manufacturing processes to ensure optimal precision. Roof prism binos are lighter than porro prism binos, can be more rugged in design, and they’ll definitely cost you some extra cash.

 

Is this binocular tripod adaptable?

Yes! This Michael Waddell bino is tripod adaptable. With 10X magnification and weighing in at 25 ounces – that’s just over 1.5 pounds, you might want to take the Bone Collector up on it.

For those who might have trouble finding where to mount the tripod, there is a round cap that’s located on the front of the center hinge. It might be on there pretty tight, but simply unscrew the cap and you have your screw hole for the tripod adapter.

 

Noteworthy Features:

  • Twist up eye cups for easy and fast use for eye relief and glasses wearers
  • BaK-4 prisms for optimal glass quality
  • Optical precision image quality with Roof Prism System
  • Part of the Michael Waddell Bone Collector Edition
  • Fully 100% waterproof and fog-proof
  • Rubber-armored for easy and secure gripping
  • Backed by Bushnell’s Lifetime Limited Warranty

 

Our Verdict on the Bone Collector Binocular

To glass it up, the Trophy XLT 10X42 Bone Collector Edition binoculars hit the best-selling ranks for a reason – they’re dependable, high quality, and oh so cool! In fact, we have even recommended them as one of the best low-budget binoculars for less than $200, as you can see here.

However, there’s more than a few complaints of being unable to correctly focus the binos to eliminate double vision. Unfortunately, this happens to be the result of a defective pair. Quality control could be better – yes. But, this Trophy XLT does have the No Questions Asked Lifetime Warranty on it. It’s an excellent warranty and you’ll definitely want to use it if you happen to get a dud.

To avoid any possible focusing issues, the Bushnell Legacy WP 8X42 binoculars (which you can read about here) are an excellent option. They even have a 10X50 Legacy bino option if you’re a “bigger is better” kinda guy.

To try your hand with another brand, the Leupold BX-1 McKenzie 10×42 binoculars fit the bill. It’s right in line with price, specs, and performance. If we’re going to pit a brand against Bushnell, you can bet that Leupold will be right up there as one of the very first competitors.

If you like your hunting gear and accessories to match, you may as well match your optics too. Sticking with Bone Collector Edition optics will say more about you than you can say about yourself. Keep your mouth shut and let Michael Waddell brag about how much of a bad ass you are!

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